Pope Benedict XVI

Good shepherds do not flee from the wolves.

30 April 2017

The Inaugural Mass of Pope Benedict XVI

Originally published 1 May 2010 A.D.

From the blog of Father John Zuhlsdorf: WDTPRS

Five[ten years ago presently] years ago Pope Benedict sat down to preach at the first solemn “inaugural” Mass of his pontificate.

Inter alia he said:

One of the basic characteristics of a shepherd must be to love the people entrusted to him, even as he Pope+Benedict+XVI+Holds+First+Mass+Saint+Peter+CSkBJBo_CSDlloves Christ whom he serves. “Feed my sheep”, says Christ to Peter, and now, at this moment, he says it to me as well. Feeding means loving, and loving also means being ready to suffer. Loving means giving the sheep what is truly good, the nourishment of God’s truth, of God’s word, the nourishment of his presence, which he gives us in the Blessed Sacrament. My dear friends – at this moment I can only say: pray for me, that I may learn to love the Lord more and more. Pray for me, that I may learn to love his flock more and more – in other words, you, the holy Church, each one of you and all of you together. Pray for me, that I may not flee for fear of the wolves. Let us pray for one another, that the Lord will carry us and that we will learn to carry one another.

The Good Shepherd, and those shepherds after His Heart, do not flee from the wolves.

I read in CNA:

Head of Italian Senate: Pope not afraid to ‘face the wolves’ in the Church

SchifaniRome, Italy, Apr 29, 2010 / 09:11 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- The Holy Father has “never been inert in the face of suffering and injustice,” the President of the Italian Senate said as he reflected on the impact of the five years of Benedict XVI’s time as Pope. The politician noted that the Pope has opted to “face the wolves” rather than avoid addressing difficulties such as cases of priests who sexually abuse minors.

The address from the leader of the Italian Senate, Renato Schifani, took place during a Wednesday evening presentation organized by the Congregation of the Children of the Immaculate Conception, which was themed “The world suffers for a lack of thought.”

Likening the Holy Father to the “messenger” of the Gospel, the image of the pastor and the fisherman, Schifani said that “Benedict XVI really knows that loving means being ready to suffer, and as pastor he gives witness to (Him) who has truly made history with men.

The day after his election, noted Schifani, the Pope asked for prayers for strength to confront “the wolves.”

Reflecting on the Pope’s attitude since then, Schifani observed that, “Facing the hidden dangers, the betrayals, the scandals, the open and painful wounds of the Church, Benedict XVI doesn’t flee out of fear before the wolves.More…



Happy St. Joseph’s Day to Benedict XVI: Your words STILL help us.

19 March 2017

Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI was born Josef Ratzinger. Named after the holy Saint Joseph, we celebrate his “Name Day” with a post from years past. This post on fraternal correction is so needed in our world today. Thank you, “Father” Benedict, as you wish to be called. Your words Still help us.

Benedict XVI: “Christians should accept fraternal correction when they are wrong”

by Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday, September 4, 2011 A.D.

There is a “mutual responsibility” of all believers “in the way of Christian life”, and all are called to correct the faults of others and at the same time to “welcome the fraternal correction.”The Pope said this during the Angelus.”Brotherly love involves a sense of mutual responsibility, so, if my brother sins against me, I must practice charity towards him and, above all, talk to him personally, pointing out that what he has said or has done is not good – the Pope said, commenting on today’s Gospel -. This approach is called fraternal correction: it is not a reaction to a suffered injury, but it is moved by love for his brother.”

“And if my brother does not listen to me?, – he continued – in today’s Gospel Jesus tells a progression: first go back to him to talk with two or three more persons, to help him to better realize what he has done, if, despite this, he still rejects the observation, then it must be communicated to the community; and if he will not even listen to the community, it is necessary to make him feel the distance that he has caused, separating himself from the communion of the Church. ” “All this – pontiff added – indicates that there is a shared responsibility in the way of Christian life: everyone, aware of his limitations and defects, is called to welcome the fraternal correction and help others with this particular service.”

At the end of the Angelus in the Apostolic Palace of Castel Gandolfo, addressing the Italian-speaking pilgrims Pope Benedict XVI greeted them” to the large group of ACLI (Christian Associations of Italian Workers) at the conclusion of their study-meeting on the theme of work- after 30 years of the Encyclical “Laborem Exercens” of Blessed John Paul II. ” “I appreciated, dear friends, your attention to this document, which remains as one of the cornerstones of the Church’s social doctrine,” the Pontiff said.

On video connection with the area of Fincantieri Ancona, where the opening Mass of the National Eucharistic Congress was celebrated, Benedict XVI addressed his “cordial greetings to all who participate in this event of grace that in the Blessed Sacrament of the Eucharist worships and praises Christ, source of life and hope for every man and for the whole world.”

Meditations for Each Day of Lent by Saint Thomas Aquinas – Day Four

13 February 2016

From the website, Catholic Harbor of Faith and Morals

Vision of Saint Thomas Aquinas by Santi de Tito 1593

by St. Thomas Aquinas


4th Day of Lent: Saturday: The Grain of Wheat

Unless the grain of wheat falling into the ground die, itself remaineth alone.–John xii. 24.

We use the grain of wheat in two ways, for bread and for seed. Here the word is to be taken in the second sense, grain of wheat meaning seed and not the matter out of which we make bread. For in this sense it never increases so as to bear fruit. When it is said that the grain must die, this does not mean that it loses its value as seed, but that it is changed into another kind of thing. So St. Paul (i Cor. xv. 36) says, That which then thou sowest is not quickened, except it die first.

The Word of God is a seed in the soul of man, in so far as it is a thing introduced into man’s soul, by words spoken and heard, in order to produce the fruit of good works, The seed is the Word of God (Luke viii. II). So also the Word of God garbed in flesh is a seed placed in the world, a seed from which great crops should grow, whence it is compared in St. Matthew’s Gospel (xiii. 31, 32) to a grain of mustard seed.

Our Lord therefore says to us, “I came as seed, something meant to bear fruit and therefore I say to you, Unless the grain of wheat falling into the ground die, itself remaineth alone” which is as much as to say, “Unless I die the fruit of the conversion of the Gentiles will not follow.” He compares Himself to a grain of wheat, because He came to nourish and to sustain the minds of men, and to nourish and sustain are precisely what wheaten bread does for men. In the Psalms it is written, That bread may strengthen man’s heart (Ps. ciii. 15), and in St. John, The bread that I will give is my flesh for the life of the world(John vi. 52).

2. But if it die it bringeth forth much fruit (John xii. 25). What is here explained is the usefulness of the Passion. It is as though the gospel said, Unless the grain fall into the earth through the humiliations of the Passion, no useful result will follow, for the grain itself remaineth alone. But if it shall die, done to death and slain by the Jews, it bringeth forth much fruit, for example:

(i) The remission of sin. This is the whole fruit, that the sin thereby should be taken away (Isaias xxvii. 9). And this is the fruit of the Passion of Christ as is declared by St. Peter, Christ died once for our sins, the just for the unjust that he might offer us to God (i Pet. iii. 18).

(ii) The conversion of the Gentiles to God. I have appointed you that you shall go forth and bring forth fruit and that your fruit should remain (John xv. 16). This fruit the Passion of Christ bore, if I be lifted tip from the earth, I will draw all things to myself (John xii. 32).

(iii) The fruit of Glory. The fruit of good labours is glorious (Wis. iii. 15). And this fruit also the Passion of Christ brought forth; We have therefore a confidence in the entering into the Holies by the blood of Christ: a new and living way which He hath dedicated for us through the veil, that is to say, His flesh (Hebr. x. 19).


Who Am I To Judge? Read this if you dare.

24 September 2014

Editor’s Note:
The explanation of “Who am I to judge?” is explained in the proper context by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI in the context of his office at the time in the Sunday Angelus. Quite different then sparring with atheistic “journalists” who want to twist everything said coming out of a Pope. In my very humble opinion, I think Pope Francis is figuring out that you have to explain the whole thing and not just spar in repartee with people who really want to destroy what you believe in. Now, I said it. Come on Catholics, make sure you chastise me for daring to suggest that perhaps Pope Francis made a human mistake by not preparing his remarks in advance.

Someone smarter than me said to me recently,”Pope Francis is trying to change the Papacy but he doesn’t yet understand the Papacy changes YOU”. Anyone can comment in my combox, it doesn’t mean I will approve it. After all, I pay for every expense on this blog so I consider myself the owner and I alone have the right to decide who and what is said in my combox. Sorry for the attitude, just a little beat up lately.

Read below if you truly want to learn something:

benedict with candle

BENEDICT XVI

ANGELUS

Sunday, 4 September 2011

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

The biblical Readings of Mass this Sunday converge on the theme of brotherly love in the community of believers whose source lies in the communion of the Trinity. The Apostle Paul says that the whole Law of God finds fullness in love, so that in our relationships with others the Ten Commandments and every other precept are summed up in these words: “Love your neighbour as yourself” (cf. Rom 13:8-10).

The Gospel text from chapter 18 of Matthew on the life of the Christian community tells us that brotherly love also involves a sense of mutual responsibility. For this reason if my brother commits a sin against me I must treat him charitably and first of all, speak to him privately, pointing out that what he has said or done is wrong. This approach is known as “fraternal correction”: it is not a reaction to the offence suffered but is motivated by love for one’s brethren.

St Augustine comments: “Whoever has offended you, in offending you, has inflicted a serious injury upon himself; and would you not care for a brother’s injury?… You must forget the offence you have received but not the injury of one of your brethren (Discourse 82, 7).

And what if my brother does not listen to me? In today’s Gospel Jesus points to a gradual approach: first, speak to him again with two or three others, the better to help him realize what he has done; if, in spite of this, he still refuses to listen, it is necessary to tell the community; and if he refuses to listen even to the community, he must be made to perceive that he has cut himself off by separating himself from the communion of the Church.

All this demonstrates that we are responsible for each other in the journey of Christian life; each person, aware of his own limitations and shortcomings, is called to accept fraternal correction and to help others with this specific service.

Another fruit of love in the community is unanimous prayer. Jesus said: “If two of you agree on earth about anything they ask, it will be done for them by my Father in Heaven. For where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I in the midst of them” (Mt 18:19-20). Personal prayer is of course important, indeed indispensable, but the Lord guarantees his presence to the community — even if it is very small — which is united and in agreement, because this reflects the very reality of the Triune God, perfect communion of love. Origen says “we should practise this symphony” (Commentary on the Gospel according to Matthew, 14,1), in other words this harmony within the Christian community. We should practise both fraternal correction — which demands deep humility and simplicity of heart — and prayer so that it may rise to God from a community truly united in Christ.

Let us ask all this through the intercession of Mary Most Holy, Mother of the Church and of St Gregory the Great, Pope and Doctor, whom we commemorated in the liturgy yesterday.


The Truth about Millennials: Their Love of the Extraordinary Form Mass & All Things Traditional

27 July 2014

Editor’s Note:
I “met” Emmy Cecilia on Twitter several years ago as a result of a common interest in all things Jane Austen. Since then I have read her blog “Journey of a Catholic Nerdwriter” faithfully.
Her blog is well written (which in itself is a pleasure) and is an interesting look at Catholicism, the world and of course Austen, among other topics through the lens of a Millennial.

Many bloggers who are over the age of thirty-five pretty much don’t “get” the younger set. I read what others think they think, but as I read blogs like Emmy Cecilia’s and others, I KNOW they do not speak for them. In addition, younger people of Emmy’s age group seem to gravitate towards me IRL. I was puzzled by this at first because I am old enough to be their… Never mind, you get the idea.

What i have gleaned from conversations with the twenty-somethings is that they want TRUTH. They want to know about all things from the past and why we have changed certain things. I have met more young people who love the 18th and 19th century everything even though most of what they learn in school is revisionist history. They know that and research the truth on their own.

Interesting, very interesting…

As someone who is a devotee of the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, I am always moved when I see college-aged people fill the pews at an EF Mass. Once in awhile I have gone to an Ordinary Form Mass and almost always I am disappointed by the lack of reverence, the terrible music and bland homily. Interesting thing. NO PEOPLE UNDER THIRTY THERE!

Plenty of senior couples, parents over 40 with young children and some high school aged kids (all bored with the music and Mass as I am) and the majority, over 50 women, alone make up the congregation at the Ordinary Form Masses I have been to.

So where are they young people we think don’t believe in God or at the least go to Church? They are at the Extraordinary Form of the Mass. Quite a few bloggers (I’m thinking over at Patheos) rail on about “Rad Trads” and how they NEVER met a kind person at a EF Mass. Well, I don’t know where you are attending an EF Mass but that is NOT most places these days.

Yes, at the beginning of the fight, there were mostly older people who were upset over the major changes in the Mass who were not given pastoral care or love at the time of the changes. I witnessed the lack of charity towards them by many priests whose rainbow stoles blocked their vision. These days, you are more likely to find the majority of the EF Mass to be homeschooling YOUNG parents, college age and young 20 something professionals and just a quarter of the parish of the older people Pope Francis seems to think are the only ones who want this Mass.

Look at the bulletin of a parish who has the EF predominately. There are more Marriages, Baptisms, First Communions, Comfirmations and Young Adult Nights than funerals now. If you don’t believe me, email me and I will send you a list of parishes offering this Mass. If you can’t get to one of these Churches, better yet, read this young Catholic blogger, Emmy Cecilia.

I have followed her college experiences as well as her faith journey. She IS one of these young people who love the EF Mass and she will tell you why. I have read many more posts from others in this age group also who say the same thing.

Pope Francis, I know you have time for everyone now or so it seems. How about meeting with some of these young, educated men and women who are not attending the Traditional Mass because it’s a fad. How about talking with the young people themselves instead of reading the bloggers at Patheos. (Exception: Katrina Fernandez of course, who is young herself and loves Pope Emeritus Benedict and all the “bling”.)

I apologize to all the younger priests and older ones also who offer the Ordinary Form in a reverent manner. I have been to quite a few here in Madison WI which are reverent and are faithful to the sacred music of the Church. My negative experiences were ALL from the EAST Coast prior to my move to Wisconsin. (Exception: St John the Beloved in McLean, VA where both the EF and OF are offered with great reverence and an exceptional music program)

Thank you for indulging my rant and I hope Emmy Cecilia forgives me for stealing her thunder here. I so enjoyed this post from the past week that it gave me the courage to finally speak out regarding the Traditional Mass bashing of the last year. Thank you Emmy Cecilia, God love you.

Sofia

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nerdwriter banner

What I Learned Wednesday #34: Millennial “Trad Fad”

posted by Emmy Cecilia at her blog, “Journey of a Catholic Nerdwriter
23 July 2014 A,D,

Benedict on NerdwriterI know, I know. It’s been a couple of week since I’ve written one of these WILW posts but most of my Wednesdays have been occupied with studying for exams so I haven’t had the chance to write. Since this is my first free Wednesday in weeks (how did that happen?!), I thought I’d spent it writing about something that has irked me lately. I usually break these things up into three parts but I’m only focusing on this one topic this week.

Have you heard of the Millennial “Trad Fad”? You know, the trend in which Millennials immerse themselves in the world of Latin Masses, mantillas/chapel veils, and other pre-Vatican II things. Golly, we Millennials are such hipsters. (side note: don’t let the article title fool you; it doesn’t actually say that we’re hipsters.) I’m kind of hoping that Pope Francis’ comments were misunderstood and that he doesn’t really think that this is a fad… but I’ve heard that he’s not a big of Latin Masses so I don’t know.

I’ve never shied away from the fact that I really, really miss Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI for several reasons, including the fact that (thanks to him) we’ve had Summorum Pontificum for 7 years now. Are the alleged quotes from Pope Francis legit? I don’t know… but I would be disappointed if they were. For someone who is so welcoming of others and their differences, the quotes made me cringe a little.

I can’t speak for others on why they prefer “traditional” Catholicism but I can tell you that many of my fellow Millennials who do have a preference to Latin Masses, chapel veils, incense (aka “smells and bells”), Gregorian chant, etc. don’t do it for the fad/trend of it. I’ve never once heard “ooh, not everyone is into this? I need to do this.” A good portion of us were poorly catechized and/or we’ve reverted/converted to the faith and we’ve come to these things on our own. Nobody did the thinking for us; we learned to appreciate them on our own. Free will, y’all. I personally looked into some – not all – of the changes that came from the Second Vatican Council while I was at that awful CINO college (because they didn’t teach these things; they taught that anything pre-Vatican II was outdated and bordered on evil) so I was able to make my own informed decisions based on my preferences.

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Please, please click HERE to go to Emmy’s blog to read the rest of her post. I pray the next time you read a “Catholic” blogger bash the Traditional Mass and/or the younger people who attend it, please speak up. Remember, this is the Mass that was offered by the Saints of the past, attended by Saints and LOVED by Saints. So how could this EVER be described as a fad or even worse (as I have heard) evil. Pray for those who are threatened by loving a Mass which was offered for centuries and helped to convert billions of souls from the past.


Growing Up Under Benedict XVI

11 February 2014

Posted by Sarah Campbell
11 February 2014 A.D.

Today is a reflective day for my mother as she reads blog after blog reflecting on the resignation of her favorite “mentor and teacher”.

Pope Benedict XVI Visits FreiburgThis has been a hard year for her physically but also emotionally as she sees many bloggers she used to admire attacking Benedict and all he did while Pope. The war on the Internet between certain Catholic bloggers has discouraged her so much she wanted just to end this blog.

I came home from boot camp and military training to help encourage her and to help with the blog. The things I have read are despicable and I am in shock that bloggers who once gave lip service to Pope Emeritus Benedict now turn on him like Robespierre on the peasants after every “Aristo” was slain.

Let me remind some of you thirty-somethings and early forty-somethings turncoat bloggers: Benedict is the Pope of my formative years. He is the Pope of my learning and loving the Mass. He is the Pope of my grammar school, high school and my 18th year. He is the Pope of my First Confession, First Holy Communion and my Confirmation. He is the Pope I thought would be with my perhaps into my twenties.

My generation learned the TRUE FAITH under his guidance. This is not a trifle. Pope Francis is our Pope now and of course, I am faithful to him. It is because I am faithful to him that I honor Benedict even more.

I am a child of Summorum Pontificum. I learned the Mass in Latin and went on to be a Latin scholar in high school because of his influence. I live a disciplined Catholic life, which in this world is the life preserver myself and my generation needs.

Say what you will “Catholic” bloggers who now slam Benedict. His pontificate was about teaching us to think and how to love. Perhaps you might want to take a break from blogging and read some of his writings… He might just teach you something you think you already know.

I was 11 going on 12 when I went to NYC to see Pope Benedict that April. One month later I received my First Holy Communion. Why so late? I asked if I could wait until then because I wanted to be truly ready. My pastor honored that request and so did my Mom and Dad.

In the years from seven through twelve my mother taught me from Joseph Ratzinger’s writings. You see, this brilliant man could be explained so easily to a child because he taught with love and with reason.

pope-catSo remember, there are many of us in this generation who truly became ” Catholics” under Pope Benedict.I don’t speak bad about any Pope. Please don’t speak unkindly about mine.

Anyway, how can you trash a Pope who had his cat on his desk while he worked? Guess I am the only one who noticed.


“Today is the Day” via @WindowintheSky

28 February 2013

28 February 2013 Anno Domini

Posted by Nikita Unverzagt at her blog,
The Unpaved Path ~ My Journey Towards God

In the late morning hours on the east coast of the United States I sadden to think about what today brings. The end of the Benedict XVI Era, for many just like me were shocked just a little over two weeks ago he announced he was stepping down as Supreme Pontiff.

I remember just the night prior talking about how the media perceived Papa because he was German and a former Hilter Youth (which was proven that he was forced) that he was aggressive and angry. Many called him the German Shepherd. Yet, if you know as I said to the friend what a true German Shepherd is like (protective to point where he will become aggressive, but obedient and loving) you shall see the name suits Papa. I explained how even though he wanted to retire he took upon the papacy with love and humility.

Could I have even imagined the next morning hearing the news of Papa’s decision to resign? Never in my slightest thought think of it. At first, I was surprised (who would not?) but then I acted just like I did with my great-uncle during his last year, I was calm and understanding. This was my Papa, my spiritual Father whose reign I was baptized under.

During my conversion I fell in love with Papa, he helped me understand the faith through his works, his words, and his example. I cannot tell how many times I would just want to listen to his voice, so calm and fatherly. What a gentle man he was and I never met him, but I knew him.

For the recent of this post please click HERE


Novena for the Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI – The Last Day

28 February 2013

28 February 2013 Anno Domini

The Fraternity of St. Peter has offered a Novena for Pope Benedict XVI which was originally published in 2007. Please join this Novena which will be prayed from February 14 through February 28 the day of the Holy Father’s retirement.

NOVENA FOR THE POPE

In Latin:

Pater Noster, 3 Ave Maria, Gloria Patri

V. Orémus pro Pontífice nostro Benedícto.
R. Dóminus consérvet eum, et vivíficet eum, et beátum fáciat eum in terra, et non tradat eum in ánimam inimicórum eius.

V. Tu es Petrus.
R. Et super hanc petram ædificábo Ecclésiam meam.

Orémus:

Omnípotens sempitérne Deus, miserére fámulo tuo Pontífici nostro Benedícto: et dírige eum secúndum tuam cleméntiam in viam salútis ætérnæ : ut, te donánte, tibi plácita cúpiat, et tota virtúte perfíciat. Per Christum Dóminum nostrum. R. Amen.

In English:

Our Father, 3 Hail Marys, Glory be.

V: Let us pray for our Pope Benedict.
R: May the Lord preserve him, and give him life, and make him blessed upon the earth, and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

V. Thou art Peter,
R. And upon this Rock, I will build My Church.

Let us Pray:

Almighty and everlasting God, have mercy upon your servant, Benedict, our Sovereign Pontiff, and guide him in your goodness on the way of eternal salvation; so that, with the prompting of your grace, he may desire what pleases you and accomplish it with all his strength. Through Christ Our Lord.

V. Mother of the Church.
R. Pray for us.

V. St. Peter.
R. Pray for us.


Novena for the Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI – Day Fourteen

27 February 2013

27 February 2013 Anno Domini

The Fraternity of St. Peter has offered a Novena for Pope Benedict XVI which was originally published in 2007. Please join this Novena which will be prayed from February 14 through February 28 the day of the Holy Father’s retirement.

NOVENA FOR THE POPE

In Latin:

Pater Noster, 3 Ave Maria, Gloria Patri

V. Orémus pro Pontífice nostro Benedícto.
R. Dóminus consérvet eum, et vivíficet eum, et beátum fáciat eum in terra, et non tradat eum in ánimam inimicórum eius.

V. Tu es Petrus.
R. Et super hanc petram ædificábo Ecclésiam meam.

Orémus:

Omnípotens sempitérne Deus, miserére fámulo tuo Pontífici nostro Benedícto: et dírige eum secúndum tuam cleméntiam in viam salútis ætérnæ : ut, te donánte, tibi plácita cúpiat, et tota virtúte perfíciat. Per Christum Dóminum nostrum. R. Amen.

In English:

Our Father, 3 Hail Marys, Glory be.

V: Let us pray for our Pope Benedict.
R: May the Lord preserve him, and give him life, and make him blessed upon the earth, and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

V. Thou art Peter,
R. And upon this Rock, I will build My Church.

Let us Pray:

Almighty and everlasting God, have mercy upon your servant, Benedict, our Sovereign Pontiff, and guide him in your goodness on the way of eternal salvation; so that, with the prompting of your grace, he may desire what pleases you and accomplish it with all his strength. Through Christ Our Lord.

V. Mother of the Church.
R. Pray for us.

V. St. Peter.
R. Pray for us.


Farewell to the Servant of the Servants of God – #ThanksPontifex

27 February 2013

 

 

BENEDICT XVI

GENERAL AUDIENCE

Saint Peter’s Square
Wednesday, 27 February 2013 Anno Domini

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

I offer a warm and affectionate greeting to the English-speaking pilgrims and visitors who have joined me for this, my last General Audience. Like Saint Paul, whose words we heard earlier, my heart is filled with thanksgiving to God who ever watches over his Church and her growth in faith and love, and I embrace all of you with joy and gratitude.

During this Year of Faith, we have been called to renew our joyful trust in the Lord’s presence in our lives and in the life of the Church. I am personally grateful for his unfailing love and guidance in the eight years since I accepted his call to serve as the Successor of Peter. I am also deeply grateful for the understanding, support and prayers of so many of you, not only here in Rome, but also throughout the world.

The decision I have made, after much prayer, is the fruit of a serene trust in God’s will and a deep love of Christ’s Church. I will continue to accompany the Church with my prayers, and I ask each of you to pray for me and for the new Pope. In union with Mary and all the saints, let us entrust ourselves in faith and hope to God, who continues to watch over our lives and to guide the journey of the Church and our world along the paths of history.

I commend all of you, with great affection, to his loving care, asking him to strengthen you in the hope which opens our hearts to the fullness of life that he alone can give. To you and your families, I impart my blessing. Thank you!

Benedict XVI


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