Catholic

To Our Veterans … thank you will never be enough .

10 November 2017

 

veterans-day

 

Day is done, gone the sun, from the lakes,From the hills, from the sky, all is well, Safely rest, God is nigh. Fading light, dims the sight, And a star gems the sky, gleaming bright, From afar, drawing nigh, falls the night. Thanks and praises, for our days, Neath the stars, neath the sky,As we go, this we know, God is neigh.

 


All Souls’ Day – Missa ‘Requiem Aeternum’ Video & Propers

2 November 2017

Image Credit: Women for Faith & Family

All Souls’ Day
Commemoratio Omnium Fidelium Defunctorum Ad primam Missam
Missa ‘Requiem Aeternum’
1st Class
Black
[Preface for the Dead; Vespers of All Souls]

Missa ‘Requiem Aeternum’

Parts One through Seven- in Playlist

 All Souls’ Day – Missa ‘Requiem Aeternum’ Propers

  The practice of recommending to God the souls in purgatory that we may mitigate to great pains which they suffer, and that He may soon bring them to His glory, is most pleasing to God and most profitable to us. For those blessed souls are His eternal spouses, and they are most grateful to those obtain their deliverance from prison, or even a mitigation of their torments. Hence, when they shall enter into heaven, they will certainly not forget those who prayed for them. It is a pious belief that God manifest to them our prayers for them, that they also may pray for us. Let us recommend to Jesus Christ, and to His holy Mother, all the souls in purgatory, but especially thus of our relatives, benefactors, friends and enemies, and, still more particularly, the souls of those for whom we are bound to pray; and let us consider that great pains which those holy spouses of Jesus Christ endure, and offer to God for their relief the Masses of this day.

 

Black 1st Class


INTROIT

Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine: et lux perpetua luceat eis. (Psalm) Te decet hymnus, Deus, in Sion et tibi reddetur votum in Jerusalem: exaudi orationem mean, ad te omnis caro veniet. Requiem aeternam… Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. (Psalm) A hymn, O God, becometh Thee in Sion; and a vow shall be paid to Thee in Jerusalem: hear my prayer; all flesh shall come to Thee. Eternal rest give unto them…

COLLECT(S)

Fidelium, Deus, omnium conditor et redemptor: animabus famulorum famularumque tuarum remissionem cunctorum remissionem cunctorum tribue peccatorum; ut indulgentiam, quam semper optaaverunt, piis supplicationibus consequantur: Qui vivis et regnas. O God, the Creator and Redeemer fo all the faithful: grant to the souls of Thy servants and handmaidens the remission of all their sins: that through pious supplications, they may obtain pardon which they always desired.

EPISTLE
I Cor. 15:51-57

Fratres: Ecce mysterium vobis dico: Omnes quidem resurgemus, se non omnes immutabimur. In momento, in ictu oculi, in novissima tuba: canet enim tuba, et mortui resurgent incorruupti et nos immutabimur. Oportet enim corruptibile hoc induere incorrunptionem: et mortale hoc induere immortalitatem. Cum atuem mortale hoc induerit immortalitatem, tunc fiet sermo, qui scriptus ets: Absorpta est mros in victoria. Ebi est mors, victoria. Ubi est, mors, victoria tua? Ubi est. mors, stimulus tuss? Simulus autem mortis peccatum est: virtus vero peccati lex. Deo autem mortis peccatum est: virtus vero peccati lex. Deo autem gratias, qui dedit nobis victoriam per Dominum nostrum Jesum Christum. Brethern: Behold, I tell you a mystery. We shall all indeed rise again: but we shall not all be changed. In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall rise again incorruptible: and we shall be changed. For this corruptible must put on incorruption; and this mortal must put on immortality. And when this mortal hath put on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written: Death is swallowed up in victory. O death, where is thy victory? O death, where is thy sting? Now the sting of death is sin: and the power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who hath given us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

GRADUAL
IV Esdr. 2:34:35

Rquieme aeternam dona eis, Domine: et lux perpetua luceat eis. In meoria aeterna erit justus: ab auditione mala non timebit. Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. The just be in everlasting remembrance; he shall not fear the evil hearing.


TRACT

Absolve, Domine, animas omnium fidelium defunctorum ab omni vinculo delictorum. Et gratia tua illis succentre, mereantur ecadere judicium ultionis. Et lucis aeternae beatitudine perfrui. Absolve, O Lord, the souls of all the faithful departed from every bond od sin. And by the help of Thy grace my they be enabled to escape the avenging judgment. And enjoy the bliss of everlasting light.


SEQUENCE

1. Dies irae, die illa, * Solvet saeclum in favilla: * Teste David cum Sibylla. 1. Day of Wrath and dome impeding, * David’s word with Sibyl’s blending. * Heaven and earth in ashes ending.
2. Quantus termore st futurus, * Quando Judex est venturus, * Cuncta stricte discussurus. 2. O what fear man’s bosom rendeth * When from heaven the Judge descendeth, * On Whose sentence all dependeth.
3. Tuba, mirum spargens sonum, * Pe sepulchra regionum, * Coget omnes ante thronum. 3. Wondrous sound the trumpet flingeth, * Through earth’s sepulchers it ringeth, * All before the throne it bringeth.
4. Mors stupebit, et natura, * Cum resurget creatura, * Judicanti responsura. 4. Death is struck, and nature quaking, * All creation is awaking, * To it’s Judge an answer making.
5. Liber sciptus proferetur, * In quo totum continetur, * Unde mundus judicetur. 5. Lo, the book exactly worded, * Wherein all hath been recorded, * Thence shall judgment be awarded.
6. Judex ergo cum sedebit, * Quidquid latet, apparebit: * Nil inultum remanebit: * Nil inumltum remanebit 6. When the Judge His seat attaineth, * And each hidden deed arraigneth, * Nothing unavenged remaineth.
7. Quid sum miser tunc dicturus? * Quem patronum rogaturus, * Cumvix justus sit securus? 7.What shall I, frail man, be pleading? * Who for me be interceding, * When the just are mercy needing?
8. Rex temendae majestatis, * Qui salvandos salvas gratis, * Salva me, fons pietatis. 8. King of majesty tremendous, * Who dost free salvation send us, * Fount of pity, then befriend us.
9. Recordare, Jesu pie, * Quod sum causa tuae viae: * Ne me perdas illa die. 9. Think, kind Jesus, my salvation * Caused Thy wondrous  Incarnation, * Leave me not to reprobation.
10. Quaerens me, sedisti lassus: * Redemisti, crucem passus: * Tantus labor non sit cassus. 10. Faith and weary Thou hast sought me, * On the cross of suffering bought me, * Shall such grace be vainly brought to me?
11. Juste Judex ultionis, * Donum fac remissionis, * Ante diem rationis. 11. Righteous Judge, fo sin’s pollution * Grant Thy gift of absolution, * Ere that day of retribution.
12. Ingemisco tamquam reus: * Culpa rubet vultus meus: * Supplicanti parce Deus. 12. Guilty now I pour my moaning, * All my shame with anguish owning, * Spare, O God, Thy suppliant groaning.
13. Qui Mariam absolvisti, * Et latronem exaudisti, * Mihi quoque spem dedisti. 13. Through the sinful woman shriven, * Through the dying their forgiven, * Thou to me a hope hast given.
14. Preces meae non sunt dignae; * Sed tu bonus fac benigne, * Ne perenni cremer igne. 14. Worthless are my prayers and sighing, * Yet, good Lord, in grace complying, * Rescue me from fires undying.
15. Inter oves locum praesta. * Et ab haedis me sequestra, * Statuen in parte dextra. 15. With Thy sheep a place provide me, * From the goats afar divide me, * To Thy right had do Thou guide me.
16. Confutatis maledictis, * Flammis acribus addictis, * Voca me cum benedictis. 16. When the wicked are confounded, * Doomed to flames of woe unbounded, * Call me with Thy Saints surrounded.
17. Oro supplex et accinis, * Corcontritum quassi cinis Gere curam mei finis. 17. Low I kneel with heart’s submission, * See, like ashes, my contrition, * Help me in my last condition.
18. Lacrimosa dies illa, * Qua resurget ex favilla. 18. Ah! that day of tears and morning, * From the dust fo earth returning.
19. Judicandus homo reus. * Huic ergo, parce Deus: 19. Man for judgment must prepare him, * Spare, O God, in mercy spare him.
20. Pie Jesu Domine, * Dona eis requiem. Amen 20. Lord all pitying, Jesus blest, * Grant them Thine eternal rest. Amen.

GOSPEL
Jn 5:25-29

In illo tempore: Dixit Jesus turbis Judaeorum: Amen, amen dico vobis, quia venit hora, et nunc est, quando mortui audient vocem Filii Dei: et qui audierint, vinit hora, et nunc est, quando mortui audient vocem Filii Dei: et qui audierint, vivent. Sicut enim Pater, havet vitar habet vitam in semetipso, sic dedit et Filio havere vitam in semetipso: et potestatem dedit ei judicium facere, qui Filius homins est. Nolite mirari hoc, qui in monumentis sutn, audient vocem Filii Dei: et procedent, qui bona fecerunt, in resurretionem vitae: qui vero mala egerunt in resurrectionem judicii. At that time, Jesus said to the multitudes of the Jews: Amen, amen I say unto you, that the hour cometh, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God, and they that hear shall live. For as the Father hath life in himself, so he hath given the Son also to have life in himself: And he hath given him power to do judgment, because he is the Son of man. Wonder not at this; for the hour cometh, wherein all that are in the graves shall hear the voice of the Son of God. And they that have done good things, shall come forth unto the resurrection of life; but they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of judgment.

OFFERTORY
Ps. 18:5

Domine Jesu Christe, Rex gloriae, libera animas omnium fidelium defunctorum de poenis inferni et de profundo lacu: libera eas de ore leonis ne absorbeat eas tartarus, ne cadant in ovscurum: sed signifer sanctus Michael repaesent eas in lucem sanctam: * Quam olim abrahae promisisti, et semini ejus. Hostias etr preces tibi, Domine, laudis offerimus: tuo suscipe pro animabus illis, quarum hodie memoriam facimus fac eas, Domine, de morte transire ad vitam. * Quam olim Abrahae promisisti et semini ejus. O Lord Jesus Christ, King of glory, deliver to souls fo all the faithful departed from the pains of hell and from the bottomless pit: deliver them from the lion’s mouth, that hell swallow them not up, that they fall no into darkness, but let the standard bearer holy Michael lead them into that light: * Which Thou didst promise of old Abraham and to his seed. We offer to Thee, O Lord, sacrifices and prayers: do Thou receive them in behalf of those souls f who we make memorial this day. Grant them , O Lord, to pass from death to that life, * Which Thou didst promise to old to Abraham and his seed.

SECRET(S)

Hostias, quaesumus, Domine, quas tibi proanimabus famulorum famularunque tuarum offerimus propitiatus intende: ut, quibus fidei christianae meritum contulisti, dones et pramium. Per Dominum nostrum. Mercifully regard, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Sacrifice which we offer Thee for the souls of Thy servants and handmaidens: that to those to whom Thou didst grant the favor of the Christian Faith Thou wouldst also grant due reward. Through our Lord.

PREFACE
Preface of the Dead

Vere dignum et justum est, aequum et salutare, nos tibi semper, et ubique gratias agere: Domine sancte, Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus: per Christum Dominum nostrum. In quo nobis spes beatae resurrectionis effulsit: ut quos contristat certa moriendi conditio eosdem consoletur futurae immortalitatis promissio. Tuis enim fidelibus, Domine, vita mutatur, non tollitur: et dissoluta terrestris hujus incolatus domo, aeterna in coelis habitatio comparatur. Et ideo Angelis et Archangelis, cum Thronis et Dominationibus, comque omni militia coelestis exeritus, hymnum gloriae tuae canimus, sine fine dicentes. It it truly meet and just, right and for our salvation, that we should at all times, and in all places, give thanks to Thee, holy Lord, Father almighty, eternal God, through Christ our Lord: in Whom the hope of a blessed resurrections heath beamed upon us: so that those who are saddened by the certainty of dying to Thy faithful people, Lord, life is changed, not taken away; and when the home of this earthly sojorn is dissolved, an enternal dwelling is made ready in heaven. And therefore with Angels and Archangels, with Thrones and Dominations, and with all the hosts of the heavenly army, we sing a hymn to Thy praise, evermore saying.

COMMUNION

Lux aeterna luceat eis, Domine * Cum Sanctis tuis in aeternum: quia pius es. Requiem aeternam dona eis Domine: et lux perpetua luceat eis: * Cum Sanctis tuis in aeternum: quia pius es. May light enteranla shine upon them, O Lord, * with Thy Saints for evermore; for Thou art gracious. Eternal rest give to them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them: * With Thy Saitns for evermore, for Thou art gracious.

POSTCOMMUNION(S)

Animabus, quaesumus, Domine, famulorum, famularumque tuaerum oratio proficiat supplicantium: ut eas et a peccatis omnibus exuas, et tuae redemptionis facias esse participes: Quivivis et regnas. May the prayer for Thy suppliant people, we beseech Thee, O Lord, avail the souls of Thy servants and handmaidens: that Thou mayest deliver them from all their sins and make them sharers in Thy Redemptions: Who livest and reignest.

H/T Traditional Latin Mass in Maryland for sources, msabeln’s Channel on You Tube for video of the Requiem Mass.


The Honor and Invocation of the Saints

1 November 2017

I saw a great multitude, which no man could number, of all nations, and tribes, and peoples, and tongues; standing before the throne, and in sight of the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms in their hands.–Apoc. vii. 9.

The words of our text explain in part the glorious vision which St. John the Evangelist had of the celestial Kingdom, the heavenly Jerusalem. There before the throne of God he beheld great multitudes from all the tribes of Israel, and other countless numbers from all peoples, tongues, and nations of the earth, clothed with white garments and palms in their hands, falling down before the throne in adoration of Him who liveth forever and ever.

This vast multitude which met the eyes of the seer of Patmos represented the Church triumphant in heaven, composed of the confessors, virgins, martyrs, and all other holy souls, who had been heroic servants of God on earth, and were now admitted to their crowns and everlasting joy. It is the festival of this glorious company that we keep today, and it behooves us at this time, while rejoicing over their triumph and their crowns, to reflect on the duties of honor and invocation which we owe them.

I. Veneration of the saints. I. There are two kinds of religious worship or veneration: (a) latria, or divine worship, by which we recognize God as our sovereign Lord and Master; (b) dulia, or veneration, by which we honor the saints and friends of God. The first is never attributed to any creature, but is proper to God alone. 2. Dulia, or the veneration given to the saints, has two degrees: (a) simple dulia, or lower degree of respect, which is shown to the servants of God; (b) hyperdulia, or higher degree of veneration, which we show to the Mother of God. 3. The reasons why we honor the Blessed Virgin, the angels, and the saints are: (a) because God has honored them by giving them grace and glory; (b) because it is natural, for if we honor our own parents, friends, heroes, and the like, how much more should we honor the Mother, friends, and heroes of God; (c) because in honoring the angels and saints we are following the example given in Holy Scripture (Gen. xviii. 2; Josue v. 15; Num. xxii. 21; Apoc. xxii. 8) and in the early Church; (d) because in honoring the angels and saints we honor God whose handiwork and masterpieces they are. 4. The means of honoring the saints are: (a) to imitate their example; (b) to celebrate their festivals in becoming manner; (c) to read and make known their lives; (d) to venerate their images and relics.

II. Invocation of the saints, I. There are two kinds of religious invocation: (a) that which is directed to the Giver of all gifts; (b) that which is directed to others for the purpose of securing their influence and intercession with the Giver of all gifts. 2. Intercession is twofold: (a) necessary intercession, which is that of Jesus Christ, through whose merits and grace alone, and in whose name alone we can obtain any favor from God (I Tim. ii. 5; I John ii. 1) ; (b) useful intercession, which is that of the saints, whose prayers, far more worthy than ours, are addressed to Christ for us. 3. The reasons for invoking the saints: (a) the saints are aware of our needs and prayers, as we know from Holy Scripture; the prophet Jeremias after his death prayed for the Jewish people (2 Mach. xv. 14-16) ; (b) the saints are willing to help us, because their charity for us is now greater than when they were on earth; (c) the saints are able to help us, because if the prayer of a just man on earth avails much before God (Jas. v. 16), how much more will the saints be able to help us!

LESSONS: 1. We should be mindful at all times, and in particular on this feast, of the honor we owe to the saints, especially the Blessed Virgin, our guardian angel and patron saint. 2. We should try to imitate in our daily lives the many shining virtues which shone forth in their lives.

Catechism of the Council of Trent, Part III

THE HONOR AND INVOCATION OF THE SAINTS

In explanation of the first Commandment the faithful are to be accurately taught that the veneration and invocation of angels and saints, who enjoy the glory of heaven, and likewise the honor which the Catholic Church has always paid even to the bodies and ashes of the saints, are not forbidden by this commandment.(1) If a king ordered that no one else should set himself up as king, or accept the honors due to the royal person, who would be so foolish as to infer from such an edict that the sovereign was unwilling that suitable honor and respect should be paid to his magistrates? Now although Christians follow the example set by the saints of the Old Law, and are said to adore the angels, yet they do not give to angels that supreme honor which is due to God alone.

And if we sometimes read that angels refused to be worshiped by men,(2) we are to know that they did so because the worship which they refused to accept was the supreme honor due to God alone.

HONOR IS DUE THE ANGELS

The Holy Spirit who says: “Honor and glory to God alone,” (3) commands us also to honor our parents and elders; (4) and the holy men who adored one God only are also said in Scripture to have “adored,” that is, supplicated and venerated, kings. If then kings, by whose agency God governs the world, are so highly honored,(5) shall it be deemed unlawful to honor those angelic spirits whom God has been pleased to constitute His ministers, whose services He makes use of not only in the government of His Church, but also of the Universe, by whose aid, although we see them not, we are every day delivered from the greatest dangers of soul and body? Are they not worthy of far greater honor, since their dignity so far surpasses that of kings?

Another claim on our veneration is their love towards us, which, as the Scripture informs us,(6) prompts them to pour out their prayers for those countries over which they are placed by Providence, as well as for us whose guardians they are, and whose prayers and tears they present before the throne of God.(7) Hence our Lord admonishes us in the Gospel not to offend the little ones,” because their angels in heaven always see the face of their Father who is in heaven.”(8)

ANGELS ARE TO BE INVOKED

Their intercession, therefore, we invoke, because they always see the face of God, and are constituted by Him the willing advocates of our salvation. The Scriptures afford examples of the invocation of angels. Jacob entreated the angel with whom he wrestled to bless him;(9) nay, he even compelled him, declaring that he would not let him go until he had blessed him. And not only did he invoke the blessing of the angel whom he saw, but also of him whom he saw not. “The angel,” says he, “who delivers me from all evils, bless these boys.(10)

TO HONOR THE SAINTS DOES NOT DETRACT FROM,

BUT ADDS TO GOD’S HONOR

From all this we are justified in concluding that to honor the saints who sleep in the Lord, to invoke their intercession, and to venerate their sacred relics and ashes, far from diminishing, tends considerably to increase the glory of God, in proportion as man’s hope is thus animated and fortified, and he himself encouraged to the imitation of their virtues. This is a practice which is also supported by the authority of the second Council of Nice,(11) the Councils of Gangra,(12) and of Trent,(13) and by the testimony of the Fathers.(14)

In order, however, that the pastor may be the better prepared to meet the objections of those who deny this doctrine, he will consult particularly St. Jerome against Vigilantius and St. John Damascene.(15) To the teaching of these Fathers should be added as a consideration of prime importance that the practice was received from the Apostles and has always been retained and preserved in the Church.(16) But what proof is more convincing than that which is supplied by the admirable praises given in Scripture to the saints? For there are not wanting eulogies which God Himself pronounced on the saints. If, then, the inspired volume celebrates the praises of particular saints, why question for a moment the propriety of paying them the same tribute of praise and veneration?(17)

Another claim which the saints have to be honored and invoked is, that they earnestly importune God for our salvation, and obtain for us by their intercession many favors and blessings. If there is joy in heaven over the conversion of one sinner,(18) will not the citizens of heaven assist those who repent? When their aid is asked by the sinner, will they not implore the pardon of his sins, and the grace of his conversion?

Should it be said, as some say, that their patronage is unnecessary, because God hears our prayers without the intervention of a mediator, the impious objection is at once met by the observation of St. Augustine: “There are many things which God does not grant without a mediator and intercessor.(19) This observation is confirmed by the well known examples of Abimelech and the friends of Job who were pardoned only through the prayers of Abraham and of Job.(20)

Should it be alleged that to recur to the patronage and intercession of the saints argues want or weakness of faith, what will the objectors answer regarding the centurion whose faith was highly eulogized by our Lord Himself, despite the fact that he had sent to the Redeemer “the ancients of the Jews,” to intercede with Him to heal his servant.(21)

True, there is but one Mediator, Christ the Lord, who alone has reconciled us to the Father through His blood,(22) and who, “having obtained eternal redemption,” and “having entered once into the holies, ceases not to intercede for us.(23) But it by no means follows that it is therefore unlawful to have recourse to the intercession of the saints. If, because we have one Mediator Christ Jesus, it were unlawful to ask the intercession of the saints, the Apostle would not have recommended himself with so much earnestness to the prayers of his brethren on earth.(24) For the prayers of the living would lessen the glory and dignity of Christ’s Mediatorship, not less than the intercession of the saints in heaven.

THE INVOCATION OF SAINTS IS APPROVED BY THE MIRACLES

WROUGHT AT THEIR TOMBS

But who would not be convinced that honor is due the saints and that they assist us, when the wonders wrought at their tombs are brought before the mind ? The blind see, the lame walk, the paralyzed are invigorated, the dead raised to life, and evil demons are expelled from the bodies of men! These are facts which St. Ambrose(25) and St. Augustine,(26) most unexceptionable witnesses, declare in their writings, not that they heard, as many did, nor that they read, as did many very reliable men, but that they saw.

But why multiply proofs ? If the clothes, the handkerchiefs,(27) and even the very shadows of the saints, while yet on earth, banished disease and restored health, who will have the hardihood to deny that God can still work the same wonders by the holy ashes, the bones and other relics of the saints? Of this we have a proof in the resuscitation of the dead body which was let down into the grave of Eliseus, and which, on touching the body of the prophet, was instantly restored to life.(28)

THE DIRECTION REGARDING IMAGES IS NOT A DISTINCT COMMANDMENT

“Thou shalt not make to thyself a graven thing, nor the likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or in the earth beneath, nor of those things that are in the waters under the earth: thou shalt not adore them nor serve them.”(29) Some, supposing these words to constitute a distinct precept, reduce the ninth and tenth commandments to one. St. Augustine holds a different opinion; considering the two last to be distinct commandments, he makes the words just quoted a part of the first Commandment.(30) His division is well known and much approved in the Church, and hence we willingly adopt it. Furthermore, for this arrangement there is a very good reason. It was fitting that to the first Commandment should be added the rewards or punishments entailed by each one of the Commandments.

THE USE OF IMAGES IS NOT FORBIDDEN

This Commandment does not prohibit the arts of painting, engraving or sculpture. The Scriptures inform us that God Himself commanded images of Cherubim,(31) and also the brazen serpent(32) to be made. The conclusion, therefore, at which we must arrive, is that images are prohibited only in as much as they are used as deities to receive adoration and so to injure the true worship of God.

TWO ABUSES OF IMAGES FORBIDDEN

As far as this commandment is concerned, there are two chief ways in which God’s majesty can be seriously outraged. The first way is by worshiping idols and images as gods, or believing that they possess any divinity or virtue entitling them to our worship, by praying to, or reposing confidence in them, as the Gentiles did, who placed their hopes in idols, and whose idolatry the Scriptures frequently condemn. The other way is by attempting to form a representation of the Deity, as if He were visible to mortal eyes, or could be represented by the pencil of the painter or the chisel of the sculptor. “Who,” says Damascene, “can represent God, invisible, as He is, incorporeal, uncircumscribed by limits, and incapable of being reproduced under any shape.”(33) This subject, however, the pastor will find treated more at large in the second Council of Nice.(34) Rightly, then, did the Apostles say of the Gentiles: “They changed the glory of the incorruptible God into a likeness of the image of a corruptible man, and of birds, and of four-footed beasts, and of creeping things;”(35) for the images of all these things, although the works of their own hands, they venerated as God. Hence the Israelites, when they exclaimed before the molten calf: “These are thy gods, O Israel, that have brought thee out of the land of Egypt,”(36) are denounced as idolaters, because they “changed their glory into the likeness of a calf that eateth grass.”(37)

THE MEANING OF THIS PART OF THE FIRST COMMANDMENT

When, therefore, the Lord had forbidden the worship of strange gods, He also forbade the making of an image of the Deity from brass or other materials, in order thus utterly to do away with idolatry. It is this Isaias declares when he asks: “To whom then have you likened God, or what image will you make for him?(38) That this is the meaning of the prohibitory part of the commandment is proved, not only from the writings of the holy Fathers, who, as may be seen in the Seventh General Council, give to it this interpretation; but also from these words of Deuteronomy, by which Moses sought to withdraw the Israelites from the worship of idols: “You saw not,” he says, “any similitude in the day that the Lord God spoke to you in Horeb, from the midst of the fire.”(39) These words this wisest of legislators addressed to the people of Israel, lest through error of any sort, they should make an image of the Deity, and transfer to any thing created, the honor due to God alone.

IT IS NOT FORBIDDEN TO REPRESENT THE PERSONS OF THE TRINITY

To represent the persons of the Holy Trinity by certain forms under which they appeared in the Old and New Testaments is not to be deemed contrary to religion or the Law of God. For who can be so ignorant as to believe that such forms are representations of the Deity?–forms, as the pastor will teach, which only express some attribute or action ascribed to God. Thus when from the description of Daniel God is painted as “the Ancient of Days,” seated on a throne, with “the books opened before him,” the eternity of God is represented and also the wisdom, by which He sees and judges all the thoughts and actions of men.(40)

THE SAME DOCTRINE TRUE WITH REGARD TO ANGELS

Angels, also, are represented under human form and with wings to give us to understand that they are actuated by benevolent feelings towards us, and are always prepared to execute the Lord’s commands; for “they are all ministering spirits, sent to minister for them who shall receive the inheritance of salvation.”(41)

REPRESENTATIONS OF THE HOLY GHOST

What attributes of the Holy Ghost are represented under the forms of a dove, and of tongues of fire, in the Gospel(42) and in the Acts of the Apostles,(43) is a matter too well known to require lengthy explanation.

THE IMAGES OF CHRIST AND THE SAINTS

But to make and honor the images of our Lord, of His holy and virginal Mother, and of the saints, all of whom were clothed with human nature and appeared in human form, is not only not forbidden by this Commandment, but has always been deemed a holy practice and a most sure indication of gratitude towards them. This position is confirmed by the monuments of the Apostolic age, the General Councils of the Church, and the writings of so many among the Fathers, eminent alike for sanctity and learning, all of whom are of one accord upon the subject.

THE LAWFUL USE OF IMAGES

But the pastor will not content himself with showing that it is lawful to have images in churches, and to pay them honor and religious respect, since this respect is referred to their prototypes; he will also show that the uninterrupted observance of this practice down to the present day has been attended with great advantage to the faithful, as may be seen in the work of Damascene on images,(44) and in the seventh General Council (the second of Nice).

But as the enemy of mankind, by his wiles and deceits, seeks to pervert even the most holy institutions, should the faithful happen at all to offend in this particular, the pastor, in accordance with the decree of the Council of Trent,(45) will use every exertion in his power to correct such an abuse, and, if necessary, explain the decree itself to the people.

He will also inform the unlettered and those who may be ignorant of the use of images, that they are intended to instruct in the history of the Old and New Testaments, and to revive the recollection of the events which they record; that thus moved by the contemplation of heavenly things we may be the more ardently inflamed to adore and love God. He will, also, inform the faithful that the images of the Saints are placed in churches, not only to be honored, but also that they may admonish us by the examples of the Saints to imitate their lives and virtues.(46)

1. See C. of Trent, Trid. sess. 17, de Sacrif. Missae, c. 3; sess. as, cap. de invocat. Sanctorum; Synod. 6, act. 6, at the end; Aug., lib. 8, de civit Dei., c. 27; lib. 10, c. i; lib. 21, contra Faust., c. 21; Basil., Hom. 20, in 40, Mar. 26, de Mar. Mamman; Nazian, oral in laud. S. Cyprian.
2. Apoc. xix. 10; Apoc. xxii. 9.
3. I Tim. i. 17; Exod. xx. 2; Levit. xix. n.
4. Deut. v. 16.
5. Gen. xxiii. 7; 2 Kings xxiv. 20; I Par. xxix. 20.
6. Dan. x. 13.
7. Tob. xii. 12; Apoc. viii. 3.
8. Matt. xviii. 10.

9. Gen. xxxii. 26; Osee xii 4.
10. Gen. xlviii. 16.
11. Conc. 2, act. 6.
12. Can. xx. Quoted in dist. 30, cap. si quis per superbiam.
13. C. of Trent, sess. 25; C. of Chalced. towards the end; 6 Synod. General, c. 7; C. of Geron, c. 3; Orleans, I, c. 29.
14. De orth. fid., lib. 4, c. 16.
15. Lib. 4, de orth fid., c. 16.

16. Dionys., c. 7, Hier. Eccles.; Iren., lib. 5, contra, haeres, c. 19; Athan. serin, in Evangel. de sancta Deip.; Eusep., lib. 13, praepar. Evang. c. 7; Cornel, pap., epist. 1; 1, Hilar. in Ps. cxxvi; Ambr. in lib. de viduis.

17. Eccl. xliv., xlv., xlvi, xlvii., xlviii., xlix.; Hebr. xi.
18. Luke xv. 7, 10.
19. Aug., quaest. 149 super Exod.; serm. 2 et 4, de St. Steph.
20. Gen. xx.
21. Matt. vii. 5; Luke vii. 3.
22. I Tim. ii. 5.
23. Heb. ix. 12; vii. 25.
24. Rom, xv, 30; Heb, xiii. 18.
25. Epist. 85, et serm. 95.
26. De civit. Dei, lib. 22, c. 8; epist 137
27. Acts v. xix. 12 et 5, 15;
28. 4 Kings xiii. 21
29. Exod. xx. 4.
30. Aug. super Exod. quaest. 71, and in Ps. xxxii., serm. 2. See St. Thomas, Q. la, IIae, 100, a.4.
31. Exod. xxv. 18; 3 Kings vi. 27.
32. Num. xxi. 8, 9.
33. Lib. 4, de orthod. fid., c. 17.
34 Art. 3.
35. Rom i. 23.
36. Exod. xxxii. 4
37. Ps. cv. 20.
38. Isa. xl. 18; Acts vii. 40.
39. Deut. iv. 15, 16.
40. Dan. vii, 13.
41. Heb. i. 14.
42. Matt. iii. 16; Mark i. 10; Luke iii. 22; John i. 32.
43. Acts ii. 3.
44. Lib. 4, de fid. orthod., cap. 17.
45. Sess. 25.

46. On the use of images see C. of Nice, act 7; Histor. tripart, lib. 6; Euseb., Hist. Eccl. I. 8. c. 14; Cyril., I. 6. c. Julian; Aug., de Consensn Ev., c. 10; Sixth Gen. Council, c. 82; C. of Rome under Gregory III and Stephen III; C. Gentil., I. de Rom. Pont. in Vita Sylvestri; Lactant., carmen de passione Domini; Basil., Orat, in S. Barlaham; Greg. Nyss., Orat. in Theod.; Prud., Hym. de S. Caes; hym. de S. Hippolyt; Baron., Ann. Eccl,, anno 57, Nos, 116 ff,; Aug., contra Faust., i, 22, c, 73.

http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals.com


St. Francis of Assisi on Of the Value and Dignity of the Soul

4 October 2017

Although the modern world seems to only give St. Francis of Assisi the title of the Saint of the environment and animals, the whole truth is that this holy Saint should be known for so much more…

St. Francis of Assisi and the Devil 02

From the Works of the Seraphic Father St. Francis of Assisi

with comment by Brother Leo of Assisi 1882

Of the Value and Dignity of the Soul

St.-Francis-Sacro-Speco-at-SubiacoThe greatest care ought to be taken of the soul, for man has not many, but only one. If God had given us two souls, as He has given us two eyes, or two feet, then should one be lost or taken away, we might guard and save the other. But as we have received only one, very weak and languishing, assailed by three most powerful enemies, and exposed to the fiery darts of the world, the flesh, and the devil, it is not lawful for it to repose securely for one single day, but it must always be striving and fighting. The Apostle gives us to understand how continual this warfare must be, when he says: ‘Our wrestling is not against flesh and blood, but against principalities and powers.’

In war, or in a battle, some time is granted to the soldiers to refresh their bodies, to lay aside their arms, to rest from their labours, and to recruit their strength; nor are they, during severe cold, compelled to rest at night exposed to the inclemency of the season, but are allowed to pass the winter in the city. But it is different with wrestlers; for then only can they be permitted to breathe, when one being overcome and thrown to the earth, the other goes away in triumph. The strife with our enemies can never cease, the time of fighting is the whole time of our life, the end of our life will be the beginning of rest; and only after death will the demonwrestler retire, after having endeavoured most strenuously to conquer us in death. Let us, therefore, most earnestly beseech Our Lord to protect us by His grace, and, in the midst of so many dangers, mercifully to defend us from our enemies. Nothing, alas! is more vile than the price for which we sell our precious souls. On the slightest occasion we cast it into hell, and for the smallest and most insignificant reward we deprive it of the inestimable treasure of Divine grace.

Source: CatholicHarborofFaithandMorals.com


The Littlest Flower in Heaven… the greatest Saint of modern time!

3 October 2017

Therese Martin was the last of nine children born to Louis and Zelie Martin on January 2, 1873, in Alencon, France. However, only five of these children lived to reach adulthood. Precocious and sensitive, Therese needed much attention. Her mother died when she was 4 years old. As a result, her father and sisters babied young Therese. She had a spirit that wanted everything.

At the age of 14, on Christmas Eve in 1886, Therese had a conversion that transformed her life. From then on, her powerful energy and sensitive spirit were turned toward love, instead of keeping herself happy. At 15, she entered the Carmelite convent in Lisieux to give her whole life to God. She took the religious name Sister Therese of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face. Living a hidden, simple life of prayer, she was gifted with great intimacy with God. Through sickness and dark nights of doubt and fear, she remained faithful to God, rooted in His merciful love. After a long struggle with tuberculosis, she died on September 30, 1897, at the age of 24. Her last words were the story of her life: “My God, I love You!”

The world came to know Therese through her autobiography, “Story of a Soul”. She described her life as a “little way of spiritual childhood.” She lived each day with an unshakable confidence in God’s love. “What matters in life,” she wrote, “is not great deeds, but great love.” Therese lived and taught a spirituality of attending to everyone and everything well and with love. She believed that just as a child becomes enamored with what is before her, we should also have a childlike focus and totally attentive love. Therese’s spirituality is of doing the ordinary, with extraordinary love.

Therese saw the seasons as reflecting the seasons of God’s love affair with us. She loved flowers and saw herself as the “little flower of Jesus,” who gave glory to God by just being her beautiful little self among all the other flowers in God’s garden. Because of this beautiful analogy, the title “little flower” remained with St. Therese.

Her inspiration and powerful presence from heaven touched many people very quickly. She was canonized by Pope Pius XI on May 17, 1925. Had she lived, she would have been only 52 years old when she was declared a Saint.
“My mission – to make God loved – will begin after my death,” she said. “I will spend my heaven doing good on earth. I will let fall a shower of roses.” Roses have been described and experienced as Saint Therese’s signature. Countless millions have been touched by her intercession and imitate her “little way.” She has been acclaimed “the greatest saint of modern times.” In 1997, Pope John Paul II declared St. Therese a Doctor of the Church – the only Doctor of his pontificate – in tribute to the powerful way her spirituality has influenced people all over the world.

Saint Therese of the Child Jesus and her “Little Way” is a spirituality that the modern world can embrace and with it, find our way to Heaven. When we look at this young woman from a time long ago, we might doubt it, but take a moment, learn about her spirituality that allowed her to become a Doctor of the Church. I think you will be very surprised that she was indeed, “the greatest Saint of modern time”. (Pope Pius XII)


Let’s celebrate the Feast of Michaelmas! +JMJ+

28 September 2017

st-michael

Feast of St. Michael (Michaelmas)

There are seven Archangels in all, but only the three mentioned in Sacred Scripture are commemorated liturgically; St. Gabriel’s Feast is on 24 March, and St. Raphael’s Feast is on 24 October (the Guardian Angels are remembered on 2 October. The other archangels, whom we know from the Book of Enoch, are Uriel, Raguel, Sariel, and Jeramiel.) Today, though, we honor St. Michael the Archangel, whose very name in Hebrew means, “Who is Like God.” St. Michael is described in the Golden Legend, written in A.D. 1275 by Jacobus de Voragine, Archbishop of Genoa, thus:

For like as Daniel witnesseth, he shall arise and address in the time of Antichrist against him, and shall stand as a defender and keeper for them that be chosen. [Daniel 10:13, 12]

He also fought with the dragon and his angels, and casting them out of heaven, had a great victory. [Apocalypse 12:7-9]

He also had a great plea and altercation with the devil for the body of Moses, because he would not show it; for the children of Israel should have adored and worshipped it. [Jude 1]

He received the souls of saints and brought them into the paradise of exultation and joy.

He was prince of the synagogue of the Jews, but now he is established of our Lord, prince of the church of Jesu Christ.

And as it is said, he made the plagues of Egypt, he departed and divided the Red Sea, he led the people of Israel by the desert and set them in the land of promission, he is had among the company of holy angels as bannerer. And bearing the sign of our Lord, he shall slay by the commandment of God, right puissantly, Antichrist that shall be in the Mount of Olivet. And dead men shall arise at the voice of this same archangel. And he shall show at the day of judgment the Cross, the spear, the nails and the crown of thorns of Jesu Christ.

Expounding on St. Michael’s final victory over the Antichrist, the Golden Legend continues:

The fourth victory is that the archangel Michael shall have of Antichrist when he shall slay him. Then Michael, the great prince, shall arise, as it is said Danielis xii.: “He shall arise for them that be chosen as a helper and a protector, and shall strongly stand against Antichrist.” And after, as the Gloss saith: “Antichrist shall feign him to be dead, and shall hide him three days,” and after, he shall appear saying that he is risen from death to life, and the devils shall bear him by art magic, and shall mount up into the air, and all the people shall marvel and worship him. And at the last he shall mount up on the Mount of Olivet, and when he shall be in a pavilion, in his siege [seat], entered into that place where our Lord ascended, Michael shall come and shall slay him. Of which victory is understood, after St. Gregory, that which is said in the Apocalypse. The battle is made in heaven.

This word of the treble battle in heaven is expounded of the battle that he had with Lucifer when he expulsed him out of heaven, and of the battle that he had with the devils that torment us.

St. Michael is our warrior against the Evil One, and is the one we call on in times of temptation, especially with our Prayer to St. Michael:

St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our safeguard against the wickedness and snares of the Devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray, and do Thou, O Prince of the Heavenly Host, by the power of God, cast into Hell, Satan and all the other evil spirits, who wander throughout the world, seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

This great champion of Israel has made many important appearances throughout the years. In A.D. 590, during the reign of Pope Gregory, a great pestilence swept through Rome.
During a procession and litanies led by the Holy Father there, St. Michael appeared over the Castel Sant’Angelo — a building which was in Normandy, France formerly Hadrian’s tomb, but which was converted to papal use, connected to the Vatican by a long tunnel. A statue of St. Michael sits atop the building today.

Mont St. Michel was built to St. Michael’s honor off the coast of Normandy, France. Our warrior Saint is said to have appeared there in 708 to St. Aubert, Bishop of Avranches.

He also, along with SS. Margaret and Catherine, appeared to St. Joan of Arc (d. 1431) when she was thirteen years old, encouraging her to assist Charles VII in defeating the English. She later told her judges, “I saw them with these very eyes, as well as I see you.”

St. Michael is patron of knights, policemen, soldiers, paramedics, ambulance drivers, etc., and also danger at sea, for the sick, and of a holy death. He is usually depicted in art carrying a sword and/or shield, battling Satan.

Customs

At this time of year, the Aster (Aster nova-belgii) blooms, and it has become known as the Michaelmas Daisy . The Michaelmas Daisy comes in many colors, from white to pink to purple. An old verse goes:

The Michaelmas Daisies, among dede weeds,michaelmasdaisies
Bloom for St Michael’s valorous deeds.
And seems the last of flowers that stood,
Till the feast of St. Simon and St. Jude.

(The Feast of SS. Simon and Jude is 28 October) An old custom surrounds Michaelmas Daisies; one plucks off the petals one by one thus: pull a petal while saying “”S/he loves me,” then pull of the next while saying “S/he loves me not,” and repeat until all petals are gone. The words one intones while pulling off the last petal lets one know if one’s love is requited.

As to foods, geese were, at least at one time, plentiful during this time of year, so roast goose dinners are traditional (eating them on this day is said to protect against financial hardship, according to Irish and English folk belief). It was also the time (at least in Ireland) when the fishing season ended, the hunting season began, and apples were harvested, so eating apples today with that goose would be a nice touch.

Roast Goose with Apples (serves 8)

1 13-lb. goose, giblets and neck discarded (you’ll need 1 lb per person)
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
8 golden delicious apples, peeled, each cut into 6 wedges
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
6 TBSP sugar
1/4 cup calvados (apple brandy)
1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

Position rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 350°F. Rinse goose inside and out; pat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle inside and out with salt and pepper. Using knife, cut small slits all over goose; place garlic slices into slits. Place goose on rack, breast side down, in large roasting pan. Roast goose 2 hours 45 minutes, basting occasionally with drippings and removing excess fat; reserve 6 tablespoons fat. Turn goose over. Roast until brown and thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 175°F, basting occasionally with drippings, about 45 minutes longer. Meanwhile, toss apples and lemon juice in large bowl. Pour 6 tablespoons goose fat into 15 x 10 x 2-inch glass baking dish. Using slotted spoon, transfer apples to baking dish; toss apples in goose fat. Add sugar, Calvados and cinnamon to apples; toss. Bake apples alongside goose until very tender and golden, about 1 hour. Serve goose with caramelized apples and a Bordeaux wine.

When you cut up your apples, cross-section a few and show your children how the 5 seeds inside the 5-pointed star found inside represent the Five Wounds of Christ. Another fun thing to do with apples is to make those little apple dolls that always resemble old people:

 

Apple Dolls

 

Peel an apple (Granny Smith or Golden Delicious apples work well), cutting away any bruises (some people say to core the apple, others say not to. Experiment for yourself). Carve as life-like a face as possible into the apple (don’t cut too deeply so as to avoid rotting). Don’t forget the little things that make a face so human — the little lines running from nose to mouth, the hollows of the eyes, the depressions caused by cheekbones, etc. Depending on the “skin” tone desired, soak the carved apple for about 45 minutes in a mixture of lemon juice (or cider vinegar) and water (the longer you soak, the lighter the “skin” tone will be).

Hang the apple up in the dryest, darkest room of your home. Come back in 3 to 4 weeks to see what you have! (Hallowe’en would be perfect time for the unveiling!) It should have shrunk by about two thirds its original size, darkened some, and show the wizened features of an old woman or man. When thoroughly dry, decorate using very diluted food colorings for rouge; corn silk, cotton, or yarn for hair; cloves or food colorings for eyes; fabric triangles for scarves, etc. Secure onto a “body” made of a bottle, styrofoam cone, wooden dowel, etc., and make clothes as desired.

For the Irish, the next food du jour is St. Michael’s Bannock, a scone-like bread, cooked in a frying pan.

St. Michael’s Bannock

1 1/3 C. barley flour
1 1/3 C. oat meal
1 1/3 C. rye meal
1 C. flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 scant tsp baking soda
2 1/2-3 C. buttermilk
3 TBSP honey or brown sugar
2 eggs
1 C. cream
4 TBSP melted butter

Mix the barley flour, oat meal, and rye meal. Add flour and salt. Mix the soda and buttermilk (start with the 2 1/2 C) and then add to the dry mixture. Stir in honey. Turn out onto floured board and mix (as with all breads, don’t over-mix), adding more buttermilk if too dry, or more flour if too sticky).

Divide dough in half, and roll each, on a floured board, into an 8″ circle (about 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch thick). While heating a lightly greased skillet, mix the eggs, cream, and melted butter. Spread onto one of the bannocks and place the bannock, egg-side down, in the skillet and cook til the egg-side is browned. Put the egg mixture on the top side, flip the bannock and cook ’til the second side is golden. Repeat this application of the egg wash and flipping and cooking until each side has been cooked three times. Do the same with the second bannock. Serve warm with butter and honey.

According to an old Irish folk tale, blackberries were supposed to have been harvested and used up by this date, too, since it is told to children that when Satan was kicked out of Heaven, he landed in a bramble patch — and returns each year to curse and spit on the fruits of the plant he landed on, rendering them inedible thereafter. So a dessert with blackberries would be perfect.

Blackberry Crumble (serves 4)

2 cups washed blackberries (thawed if frozen)
2/3 cup sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice, or juice of 1 lemon
3 tablespoons butter
2/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/8 teaspoon salt

Put blackberries in a 1-quart baking dish with half of the sugar. Sprinkle with lemon juice. Cream butter, remaining sugar, flour, and salt together; sprinkle over berries. Bake at 350° for 40 minutes. Serve warm or cold with cream, ice cream, or dessert sauce.

Finally, I have to tell you about a charming Bavarian Michaelmas tradition from Augsburg, as described by Dorothy Gladys Spicer’s “The Festivals of Western Europe” (1958):

On September 29, Saint Michael’s Day, the city of Augsburg holds an annual autumn fair to which hundreds of peasants from far and near come for trade and pleasure. Chief among the day’s attractions is the hourly appearance of figures representing the Archangel and the Devil. The figures are built in the foundation of Perlach Turm, or Tower, called Tura in local dialect. This slender structure, which rises to a height of two-hundred-and-twenty-five-feet and stands next to the Peter’s Kirche, north of the Rathaus, originally was a watch tower. In 1615 the watch tower was heightened and converted into a belfry.

Almost a hundred years earlier the group depicting the saint and the devil had been installed in the tower’s understructure. Annually on his feast day the archangel’s armor-clad figure, holding a pointed spear, appeared whenever the tower bell struck, and stabbed at the devil writhing at his feet.

During World War II the historic figures–the delight of generations of fair-goers–were destroyed. Since then a new group has been made and installed. Today, as for over four centuries, spectators continue to gather about the Tura and to watch breathlessly the symbolic drama of Michael, head of the Church Triumphant, dealing death blows to the dragon which brings evil and destruction to the world of men.

Note: “Michaelmas” is pronounced “MICKel-mus.”

Today is also one of the 4 English “Quarter Days,” days which fall around the Equinoxes or Solstices and mark the beginnings of new natural seasons (i.e., Spring, Summer, Winter, Fall) and which were used in medieval times to mark “quarters” for legal purposes, such as settling debts. The other days like this are: Lady Day (the Feast of the Annunciation) on March 25, the Feast of St. John on June 24, and Christmas on December 25.

Source: Fisheaters


#HurricaneIrma: † A Prayer or Blessing against Storms †

8 September 2017

Editor’s Note: With storms in our forecasts often causing loss of life, injury and loss of home and property, we thought we would feature this post previously published.

While praying this prayer, note that the Crosses featured in the prayer are a direction to bless oneself with the Sign of the Cross wherever indicated. Our Always Catholic Prayer Warriors which include Religious as well praying for our readers intentions.

Jesus Christ The King of Glory has come in Peace. † God became man, † and the Word was made flesh. † Christ was born of a Virgin. † Christ suffered. † Christ was crucified. † Christ died. † Christ rose from the dead. † Christ ascended into Heaven. † Christ conquers. † Christ reigns. † Christ orders. † May Christ protect us from all storms and lightning † Christ went through their midst in Peace, † and the word was made flesh. † Christ is with us with Mary. † Flee you enemy spirits because the Lion of the Generation of Judah, the Root David, has won. † Holy God! † Holy Powerful God! † Holy Immortal God! † Have mercy on us. Amen!


The Pope: A Day in the Life

21 August 2017

Editors Note: Today is the Feast day of Pope St Pius X. We pray for the Society of St Pius X on this day, especially.

From the blog @TorontoCatholic Witness

Written by Barona

Pope Pius X rose about four, shaved and dressed without a valet. Then he went to his private chapel, meditated and read Prime from an immense breviary which was his most treasured possession. He said Mass, served by one of his chaplains, and himself gave Communion to those invited to assist; then he heard a second Mass. A cup of black coffee awaited him in his study. A sort walk in the garden. Back to his study and his correspondence and a few private audiences. A simple dinner at one, usually in the company of several members of his household.

Pius X broke the tradition which prescribed that the Pope eat alone. When he invited someone to dine with him he saw consternation on several faces. When he asked the reason, he was told that it had been the custom of the popes to dine alone.

“Since when has it been the custom?”, he asked.

‘Since Urban VIII set the rule”, was the answer.

“If Urban VIII had the right to make such a rule,” he said serenely, “then Pius X has an equal right to abolish it”.

Continue after the jump >>>> HERE


Only #Christ Can Save Those in #Antifa & #AltRight

21 August 2017

 

Alt-Left and Alt-Right refuse to imitate Christ

posted by Barona at @TorontoCatholic Witness Blog

Church Militant reports on a series of attacks on Catholic churches in once Christian nations. This is to be expected. This morning I reviewed a video by Ezra Levant following the seeming implosion of his so-called “Rebel Media”. What was infinitely more interesting was the combox. It was strewn with profanity, blasphemy, hatred – from both “alt-right” and “alt-left”.

Never any mention of Our Lord Jesus Christ or His Church. These people are neo-pagan. Even those who profess Christianity, speak and act no differently than the neo-pagan. Catholics need to come to grips with the depth of liberalism and neo-paganism that surrounds them; the very air we breath is liberal and neo-pagan.

For some, it may not seem much, it may seem nearly trivial – but that only reveals the degree of their neo-paganism. That is the use of vulgarity, profanity, filth. Vulgar words reflect a vulgar and uncivilized mind. That was one of the things that struck me on the so-called “combox”. These people are brutalized.

Firstly, you sexualize, then you brutalize. The violent, brutal, hate-filled youth of “left” and “right” are unthinkable prior to mass sex-education. Obscenity, vulgarity – even amongst so-called “traditional’ and “conservative” – dare I use the word? – “Catholics” – has become the norm. [Editor’s emphasis]

    For the rest of this thought-provoking essay on Truth please continue after the jump>>> by clicking HERE…

Acclaimed #Atheist Poet Becomes #Catholic: ‘My Tears Just Stopped’

20 August 2017

By Mark Judge
Published at CNSnews.com

“If you’re there, you have to help me.”

Those are the words that poet Sally Read said to an icon of Jesus in 2010. Read, a British poet and atheist, had stopped into a church in Santa Marinella, Italy. She felt burdened. Her young daughter was having health issues. Her husband Fabio was enduring some stress at work.

“There was this incredible experience where this presence almost came down, and my tears just stopped, just dried,” Read tells CNSNews.com. “I felt almost physically carried up. It was as if someone walked into the room. I knew this person. I knew that I was a Christian.”

Up to that point Read, now 46, had been an atheist. “Night’s Bright Darkness: A Modern Conversion Story.” “At ten I could tell you that religion was the opiate of the masses; it was [driven] into me to never kneel before anyone or anything…As a young woman I could quote Christopher Hitchens and enough of the Bible to scoff at.”

Read was born in 1971 and raised in Suffolk, England. As a young woman she worked as a nurse in a psychiatric hospital and became a critically acclaimed poet, winning the Eric Gregory Award in 2001. A few years later Read married an Italian man, Fabio, and the couple, along with new daughter Florenzia, moved to Santa Marinella, a town 30 miles from Rome.

In her 30s and raising her daughter, Read began working on a book on women’s health and sexuality. Wanting to interview a wide swath of women for the book, Read contacted orthodox Catholic women. When the women declined to be interviewed, largely due to the graphic nature of Read’s subject matter, Read approached a Byzantine-Catholic priest, Fr. Gregory Hrynkiw, for advice. Fr. Gregory and Read became friends, with the priest answering questions the author had about faith.

It was around this time that Read found something fresh in one of her favorite books, “I Capture the Castle.” “The book was written for children, and I read it almost every year,” Read says. “I read the book for comfort. There’s one scene where the protagonist Cassandra, whom I’ve always identified with, has this conversation with this vicar. I never noticed what he said to her – it was about art as being the ultimate attempt at communion with God. It really hit me. It just broke through.”

She adds, “In retrospect, I think that God works through things very specifically. It’s no coincidence that that book grew with me.”

Then, in 2010, Read had the experience in the church where she felt the presence Christ. She became more interested in the Catholic Church.

“I was passionately in love with Christ, and I knew that I was a Christian. It was a question of ‘What does God what me to do with that?’ I read the Gospels, and I read St. John of the Cross.” Reading Thomas Aquinas, Read says she saw “the logic behind the love.”

She adds, “Running alongside the reading I just felt this presence in Catholic churches. I just knew the best way to get close to Christ was though communion.”

In December 2012, Read was received into the Catholic Church at the Vatican.

The poet is now working on a novel. She says her new life has made her a better artist. “As a poet from a mostly secular culture, I have come to know the Church as the ultimate poem,” she says. “An intricate composition of allegory and reality, that tries to give image to God’s presence on earth.”

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