Posts Tagged ExtraOrdinary Form

Spy Wednesday of Holy Week – Tenebrae

12 April 2017

Tenebrae Service
St. John Cantius Choir, Chicago, Illinois


Part I

Part II

Part III

On the evening of Spy Wednesday, Wednesday in Holy Week, Matins and Lauds is sung in a special form known as Tenebrae.

During the late afternoon of Spy Wednesday (following the practice in Rome), or in the early evening, the service of Tenebrae is sung. Tenebrae is Matins and Lauds, as usual anticipated, of the following liturgical day but the Office of the Triduum shows signs of antiquity and has developed a ceremonial extinguishing of candles that mimetically represent the desertion of the LORD by his disciples and the days of darkness – hence the name.

The altar is vested in violet antependia and the Blessed Sacrament removed if It is present on the choir altar. The altar cross is veiled in violet and the candlesticks, the plainest set used on Good Friday, bearing six lighted candles of unbleached wax.

In Rome Tenebrae in the Papal Chapel was celebrated very early so the rays of the setting sun would pass through a window of the Sistine Chapel. The Caeremoniale Episcoporum mentions Tenebrae starting progressively later each day of the Triduum. In practice the service ‘works best’ if it at least ends in near darkness.

In the sanctuary in about the place where the Epistle is sung is placed the Tenebrae hearse. The hearse, for the Roman rite, bears fifteen lighted candles of unbleached wax. The choir enters, seniores ante inferiores, take their places and kneels to say Aperi, Domine. When the choir rises the sign of the Cross is made as the cantors intone the first antiphon of Matins, Zelus domus tuae. This is sung in full and then the first psalm Salvum me fac, Deus intoned. At the end of the psalm (there is no Gloria Patri during the Triduum) the lowest candle on the Gospel side of the hearse is extinguished. Before the 1911-13 reform the chant books had a special cadence at the end of each psalm, a drop of a fourth, which presumably was an audible indication for the acolyte to extinguish a candle. Then the next antiphon is sung with its psalm etc. After the first three psalms there is a versicle and response and then all stand for a silent Pater noster. During the Triduum there are no absolutions and blessings at Mattins. The psalms of Mattins for Tenebrae on Mandy Thursday are really the first nine of the twelve ferial psalms from the pre-Pius X Breviary for Mattins. In the reformed Breviary they appear ‘proper’ but are in fact the ancient practice. They are: I nocturn, 68, 69, 70; II nocturn, 71, 72, 73; III nocturn, 74, 75, 76.

The follows the Lamentations of Jeremy the Prophet as first nocturn lessons. These are from the OT book and have verses based on a Hebrew acrostic. The first verse thus begins with ‘Aleph’. The verses have several special tones in plainsong and have been set to polyphony by various composers. The lessons are sung from a lectern medio chori. A responsory follows the first lessons as usual at Mattins. After the third responsory the second nocturn begins and has lessons from St. Augustine on the psalms. The third nocturn has lessons from St. Paul to the Corinthians on the foundation of the Holy Eucharist. At Tenebrae the Hebodomadarius does not chant the ninth lesson. At the end of Mattins the Tenebrae Hearse has five candles exstinguished on the Gospel side and four on the Epistle side with six remaining lit candles.

Lauds follow immediately. The psalms sung at Lauds are Pss. 50, 89, 35, Cantemus Domino, 146. After each psalm of Lauds a further candle is extinguished so that after the last psalm only the candle on the summit of the hearse is still alight. After the last antiphon is repeated a versicle and response follow. Then the antiphon on the Benedictus is intoned, for Maundy Thursday this is Traditor autem dedit eis signum, dicens: Quem osculatus fuero, ispe est, tenete eum. The concept of the betrayal of Judas is key to the day. The plainsong for the Benedictus is the haunting tone 1g. During the last six verses each of the altar candles is exstinguished beginning with the outside candle on the Gospel side. All other lamps in the church are now also extinguished. During the repetition of the antiphon the MC takes the candle from the hearse and places it on the mensa at the Epistle corner of the altar. All kneel and the choir now sings Christus factus est pro nobis obediens usque ad mortem. During this antiphon the MC hides the lit candle behind the altar. A Pater noster is now said in a low voice by all and then psalm 50, the Miserere is chanted in a subdued voice. This has been adapted by many composers into polyphonic masterpieces, perhaps the most famous being by Allegri. The Miserere was part of the ferial preces of Vespers until 1911-13. After the Miserere the collect Respice is chanted by the Hebdomadarius, still kneeling. Then a strepitus or noise is made traditionally by banging books against the stalls.

After the strepitus [the noise that symbolizes the earthquake that took place at Christ’s death, which is made by banging books on the choir stalls. While this symbolism maintains, it is also as if, with the strepitus, we’re begging Christ to come out of the tomb, especially on Holy Saturday. While the strepitus is still going on, the Christ candle–the Light which the darkness cannot overcome–is brought back out and replaced in the hearse, and all depart in silence.source: Michael E, Lawrence, NLM.org] the MC brings forth the candle and returns this symbol of the light of Christ to the top of the hearse. It either remains there or is taken by the MC ahead the procession as the choir processes out of the sanctuary.

In the ‘liturgical books of 1962’ following the ‘Restored’ order of Holy Week dalmatic and tunicle are worn by the deacon and subdeacon rather than folded chasubles. No commemorations are allowed and there is no second collect in the Masses. Any text read by a lector, subdeacon or deacon is not read by the celebrant (extended throughout the year in the 1962 books). OHSI of 1955 orders the Orate fratres to be said in an audible voice and all present to respond. Ferial preces are sung only on Wednesdays at Lauds and Vespers only. The Passion according to St. Mark on Tuesday is shortened: Mark 14: 32-72; 15: 1-46 as is the Passion according to St. Luke on Wednesday: Luke 22: 39-71; 23: 1-53.

Editor’s Note: Thank you to ethicalgop’s You Tube channel for the St. John Cantius videos.
In addition, thank you to The Saint Lawrence Press Ltd for the information above for the Tenebrae on spy Wednesday evening.

Image Credit: A Catholic Life: Luke 22:1-71; 23:1-53 tlm-md.blogspot.com

From the blog of Father John Zuhlsdorf,

What Does The Prayer Really Say?

The term “Spy” Wednesday probably is an allusion to Christ’s betrayal by Judas.

COLLECT
Deus, qui pro nobis Filium tuum
crucis patibulum subire voluisti,
ut inimici a nobis expelleres potestatem,
concede nobis famulis tuis,
ut resurrectionis gratiam consequamur.

This prayer was the Collect for this same day in the 1962 Missale Romanum. It was also in the ancient Gregorian Sacramentary in both the Hadrianum and Paduense manuscripts.

The impressive and informative Lewis & Short Dictionary informs us that patibulum (deriving from pateo) is “a fork-shaped yoke, placed on the necks of criminals, and to which their hands were tied; also, a fork-shaped gibbet”. In turn, English “gibbet” means “an upright post with a projecting arm for hanging the bodies of executed criminals as a warning”.

The verb subeo in its basic meaning is “to come or go under any thing” and by logical extension “to subject one’s self to, take upon one’s self an evil; to undergo, submit to, sustain, endure, suffer”. The L&S explains that “The figure taken from stooping under a load, under blows, etc.)” There are other shades of meaning, including “to come on secretly, to advance or approach stealthily, to steal upon, steal into”. Keep this one in mind.

Consequor is very interesting. It signifies “to follow, follow up, press upon, go after, attend, accompany, pursue any person or thing” and then it extends to concepts like “to follow a model, copy, an authority, example, opinion, etc.; to imitate, adopt, obey, etc.” and “to reach, overtake, obtain”. Going beyond even these definitions, there is this: “to become like or equal to a person or thing in any property or quality, to attain, come up to, to equal (cf. adsequor).” I know, I know – mentio non fit expositio. Still it is interesting to make connections in the words, which often have subtle overlaps. Remember that interesting meaning of subeo, above? There is a shade of “pursuit” and “imitation” in the prayer’s vocabulary.

SLAVISHLY LITERAL RENDERING
O God, who willed Your Son to undergo
on our behalf the gibbet of the Cross
so that You might drive away from us the power of the enemy,
grant to us Your servants,
that we may obtain the grace of the resurrection.

This is an austere prayer, razor like, cutting to the heart of the matter. By our sins we are in the clutches of the enemy, who mercilessly attacks us. Christ freed us from dire consequences of slavery to sin by His Passion.

LAME-DUCK ICEL VERSION
Father,
in your plan of salvation
your Son Jesus Christ accepted the cross
and freed us from the power of the enemy.
May we come to share in the glory of his resurrection.

The ancient Romans would have their conquered foes pass under a yoke (iugum), to show that they were now subjugated. Their juridical status changed. Christ went under the Cross in its carrying and then underwent the Cross in its hideous torments. In his liberating act of salvation, we passed from the servitude of the enemy to the service of the Lord, not as slaves, but as members of a family.

We are not merely household servants (famuli), we are according the status of children of the master of the house, able to inherit what He already has.

A Blessed Holy Week to all!.


Ash Wednesday: Missa ‘Misereris Omnium’ Link to LIVE EF Mass 9AM EST with Propers

1 March 2017


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The Propers follow the link below for the Extraordinary Form Mass offered LIVE online by the Priestly Fraternity of Saint Peter.

LIVE Link to the Ash Wednesday Mass at Christ the King Roman Catholic Church, Sarasota, Florida: Please click HERE

“The LIVE Mass that streams to LIveMass.net is actively taking place in Sarasota, Florida. At all times the screen will remain blank until ten minutes before the scheduled Mass. Mass times are Sunday (Low Mass) at 8:30 a.m. EST. The High Mass is at 10:30 a.m. EST. All other times the screen will remain blank. The Daily Mass schedule is Monday through Saturday 9:00 a.m. EST and Tuesday and Friday evening an additional daily Mass at 6:30 p.m. EST. The Recollection of the Confraternity of Saint Peter takes place also on the 2nd Friday of the month at 6:30 P.M. EST.” from the website of livemass.net

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Ash Wednesday

Purple

1st Class Feria

[STATION AT ST. SABINA]

Blessing of the Ashes

Before the Mass, the ashes obtained by burning the branches of olive and other trees blessed the preceding year, are now blessed. When None has been said in choir, the priest, vested in alb, stole, and purple cope, stands at the epistle corner of the altar, on which is placed a vessel containing the ashes to be blessed. The choir sings the following antiphon:

ANTIPHON ¤ Ps. 68.17

Exaudi nos, Domine, quoniam benigna est misericordia tua: et secundum multitudinem miserationum tuarum repice nos, Domine. — Salvum me fac, Deus: quoniam intraverunt aquae usque ad animam meam. V.: Gloria Patri . . . — Exaudi nos, Domine . . . Hear us, O Lord, for Thy mercy is kind: look upon us, O Lord, according to the multitude of Thy tender mercies. — (Ps. 68. 2). Save me, O God: for the waters are come in even unto my soul. V.: Glory be to the Father . . . — Hear us, O Lord, for Thy mercy is kind . . .

Afterwards the priest, standing at the epistle side, without turning towards the people, with his hands joined, says:

V.: Dominus vobiscum. V.: The Lord be with you.

R.: Et cum spiritu tuo. R.: And with thy spirit.

Oremus. — Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, parce paenitentibus, propitiare supplicantibus, et mittere digneris sanctum Angelum tuum de caelis, qui bene†dicat, et sancti†ficet hos cineres, ut sint remedium salubre omnibus nomen sanctum tuum humiliter implorantibus, ac semetipsos pro conscientia delictorum suorum accusantibus, ante conspectum divinae clementiae tuae facinora sua deplorantibus, vel serenissimam pietatem tuam suppliciter, obnixeque flagitantibus: et praesta per invocationem sanctissimi nominis tui; ut quicumque per eos aspersi fuerint, pro redemptione peccatorum suorum, corporis sanitatem, et animae tutelam percipiant. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.

R.: Amen. Let us pray. — O almighty and everlasting God, spare those who are penitent, be merciful to those who implore Thee; and vouchsafe to send Thy holy Angel from heaven, to bless † and hal†low these ashes, that they may be a wholesome remedy to all who humbly implore Thy holy Name, and who accuse themselves, conscious of their sins, deploring their crimes before Thy divine mercy, or humbly and earnestly beseeching Thy sovereign goodness: and grant through the invocation of Thy most holy Name that whosoever shall be sprinkled with them for the remission of their sins may receive both health of body and safety of soul. Through Christ our Lord.

R.: Amen.

Oremus. — Deus, qui non mortem, sed paenitentiam desideras peccatorum: fragilitatem conditionis humanae benignissime respice; et hos cineres, quos causa proferendae humilitatis, atque promerendae veniae, capitibus nostris imponi decernimus, bene†dicere pro tua pietate dignare: ut, qui nos cinerem esse, et ob pravitatis nostrae demeritum in pulverem reversuros cognoscimus; peccatorum omnium veniam, et praemia paenitentibus repromissa, misericorditer consequi mereamur. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.

R.: Amen. Let us pray. — O God, who desirest not the death, but the repentance of sinners, look down most graciously upon the frailty of human nature; and in Thy goodness vouchsafe to bless † these ashes which we purpose to put opon our heads in token of our lowliness and to obtain forgiveness: so that we who know that we are but ashes, and for the demerits of our wickedness are to return to dust, may deserve to obtain of Thy mercy, the pardon of all our sins, and the rewards promised to the penitent. Through Christ our Lord.

R.: Amen.

Oremus. — Deus, qui humiliatione flecteris, et satisfactione placaris: aurem tuae pietatis inclina precibus nostris; et capitibus servorum tuorum, horum cinerum aspersione contactis, effunde propitius gratiam tuae benedictionis: ut eos et spiritu compunctionis repleas, et quae iuste postulaverint, efficaciter tribuas; et concessa perpetuo stabilita, et intacta manere decernas. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.

R.: Amen. Let us pray. — O God, who art moved by humiliation, and appeased by satisfaction: incline the ear of Thy goodness to our prayers and mercifully pour forth upon the heads of Thy servants sprinkled with these ashes the grace of Thy blessing: that Thou mayest both fill them with the spirit of compunction, and effectually grant what they have justly prayed for: and ordain that what Thou hast granted may be permanently established and remain unchanged. Through Christ our Lord.

R.: Amen.

Oremus. — Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, qui Ninivitis in cinere et cilicio paenitentibus, indulgentiae tuae remedia praestitisti: concede propitius; ut sic eos imitemur habitu, quatenus veniae prosequamur obtentu. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.

R.: Amen. Let us pray. — O almighty and everlasting God, who didst vouchsafe Thy healing pardon to the Ninivites doing penance in sackcloth and ashes, mercifully grant that we may so imitate them in our outward attitude as to follow them in obtaining forgiveness. Through Christ our Lord .. .

R.: Amen.

The priest then sprinkles the ashes thrice with holy water, singing the anthem Asperges me . . . and incenses them thrice. After which, having first received the ashes on his own head, from the highest in dignity of the clergy, he proceeds to place them, in the form of across, on the heads or foreheads of the clergy and people, saying to each:

Memento, homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverem reverteris. (Gen. 3. 19) Remember, man, that thou art dust, and unto dust thou shalt return.

Meanwhile the choir sings the following anthems and responses:

ANTIPHON ¤ Joel 2. 13

Immutemur habitu, in cinere et cilicio: ieiunemus, et ploremus ante Dominum: quia multum misericors est dimittere peccata nostra Deus noster. Let us change our garments for ashes and sackcloth: let us fast and lament before the Lord: for plenteous in mercy is our God to forgive our sins.

ANOTHER ANTIPHON ¤ Joel 2. 17

Inter vestibulum et altare plorabunt sacerdotes ministri Domini, et dicent: Parce, Domine, parce populo tuo: et ne claudas ora canentium te, Domine. Between the porch and the altar, the priests, the Lord’s ministers, shall weep and shall say: Spare, O Lord, spare Thy People: and close not the mouths of them that sing to Thee, O Lord.

RESPONSE ¤ Esther 13; Joel 2

R.: Emendemus in melius, quae ignoranter peccavimus: ne subito praeoccupati die mortis, quaeramus spatium poenitentiae, et invenire non possimus. * Attende, Domine, et miserere: quia peccavimus tibi. R.: Let us amend for the better in those things in which we have sinned through ignorance; lest suddenly overtaken by the day of death, we seek space for repentance and are not able to find it. * Attend, O Lord, and have mercy: for we have sinned against Thee.

V.: Adiuva nos, Deus salutaris noster: et propter honorem nominis tui, Domine, libera nos. * Attende, Domine. V.: Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. * Attende . . . V.: (Ps. 78. 9). Help us, O God, our savior: and for the glory of Thy Name, O Lord, deliver us. * Attend, O Lord . . . V.: Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost. * Attend . . .

When all have received the ashes, the priest says:

V.: Dominus vobiscum. V.: The Lord be with you.

R.: Et cum spiritu tuo. R.: And with thy spirit.

Oremus. — Concede nobis, Domine, praesidia militiae christianae sanctis inchoare ieiuniis: ut contra spiritales nequitias pugnaturi continentiae muniamur auxiliis. Per Christum Dominum nostrum.

R.: Amen. Let us pray. — Grant us, O Lord, to begin with holy fasts the campaign of our Christian warfare: that, as we do battle with the spirits of evil, we may be protected by the help of self-denial. Through Christ our Lord.

R.: Amen.

 

 

Holy Mass

INTROIT ¤ Wisdom 11. 24, 25, 27

Misereris omnium, Domine, et nihil odisti eorum quae fecisti, dissimulans peccata hominum propter poenitentiam et parcens illis: quia tu es Dominus Deus noster. — Miserere mei, Deus, miserere mei: quoniam inte confidit anima mea. V.: Gloria Patri . . . — Misereris omnium, Domine . . . Thou hast mercy upon all, O Lord, and hatest none of the things which Thou hast made, overlooking the sins of men for the sake of repentance, and sparing them: because Thou art the Lord our God. — (Ps. 56. 2). Have mery on me, O God, have mercy on me: for my soul trusteth in Thee. V.: Glory be to the Father . . . — Thou hast mercy upon all, O Lord . . .

The Gloria in Excelsis is not said until Maundy Thursday.

COLLECT

Praesta Domine fidelibus tuis: ut ieiuniorum veneranda solemnia, et congrua pietate suscipiant, et secura devotione percurrant. Per Dominum . . . Grant, O Lord, to Thy faithful people, that they may undertake with fitting piety the venerable solemnities of fasting, and complete them with steadfast devotion. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost . . .

EPISTLE ¤ Joel 2. 12-19

Lesson from the Prophet Joel.

Lectio Ioelis Prophetae.

[Almighty God is rich in mercy and clemency to those who are converted to Him in fasting, in weeping and in mourning.]

Haec dicit Dominus: Convertimini ad me in toto corde vestro, in ieiunio, et in fletu, et in planctu. Et scindite corda vestra, et non vestimenta vestra, et convertimini ad Dominum Deum vestrum: quia benignus et misericors est, patiens, et multae misericordiae, et praestabilis super malitia. Quis scit, si convertatur, et ignoscat, et relinquat post se benedictionem, sacrificiam, et libamen Domino Deo vestro? Canite tuba in Sion, sanctificate ieiunium, vocate coetum, congregate populum, sanctificate Ecclesiam, coadunate senes, congregate parvulos, et sugentes ubera: egrediatur sponsus de cubili suo, et sponsa de thalamo suo. Inter vestibulum et altare plorabunt sacerdotes ministri Domini, et dicent: Parce, Domine, parce populo tuo: et ne des haereditatem tuam in opprobrium, ut dominentur eis nationes. Quare dicunt in populis: Ubi est Deus eorum? Zelatus est Dominus terram suam, et pepercit populo suo. Et respondit Dominus, et dixit populo suo: Ecce ego mittam vobis frumentum, et vinum, et oleum, et replebimini eis: et non dabo vos ultra opprobrium in gentibus: dicit Dominus omnipotens. Thus saith the Lord: Be converted to Me with all your heart, in fasting and in weeping and in mourning. And rend your heats and not your garments, and turn to the Lord your God: for He is gracious and merciful, patient and rich in mercy, and ready to repent of the evil. Who knoweth but He will return and forgive and leave a blessing behind Him, sacrifice and libation to the Lord your God? Blow the trumpet in Sion, sanctify a fast, call a solemn assembly, gather together the people, sanctify the Church, assemble the ancients, gather together the little ones and them that suck at the breasts: let the bridegroom go forth from his bed and the bride out of her bride chamber. Between the porch and the altar the priests, the Lord’s ministers, shall weep and shall say: Spare, O Lord, spare Thy people; and give not Thine inheritance to reproach, that the heathen should rule over them. Why should they say among the nations: Where is their God? The Lord hath been zealous for His land, and hath spared His people. And the Lord answered and said to His people: behold I will send you corn and wine and oil, and you shall be filled with them: and I will no more make you a reproach among the nations: saith the Lord almighty.

GRADUAL ¤ Ps. 56. 2, 4

Miserere mei, Deus, miserere mei: quoniam in te confidit anima mea. V.: Misit de coelo, et liberavit me: dedit in opprobrium conculcantes me. Have mercy on me, O Lord, have mercy on me: for my soul trusteth in Thee. V.: He hath sent from heaven and delivered me: He hath made them a reproach that trod upon me.

TRACT ¤ Ps. 102, 10

Domine, non secundum peccata nostra, quae fecimus nos: neque secundum iniquitates nostras retribuas nobis. V.: Domine, ne memineris iniquitatum nostrarum antiquarum, cito anticipent nos misericordiae tuae: quia pauperes facti sumus nimis. O Lord, repay us not according to the sins we have committed, nor according to our iniquities. V.: (Ps. 78. 8, 9) O Lord, remember not our former iniquities, let Thy mercies speedily prevent us: for we are become exceeding poor.

V.: Adiuva nos, Deus salutaris noster: et propter gloriam nominis tui, Domine, libera nos: et propitius esto peccatis nostris, propter nomen tuum. [Here kneel.]

V.: Help us, O God, our Savior: and for the glory of Thy Name, O Lord, deliver us: and forgive us our sins for Thy Name’s sake1

GOSPEL ¤ Matth. 6. 16-21

† Continuation of the holy Gospel according to St. Matthew.

† Sequentia sancti Evangelii secundum Matthaeum.

[It is not our garments that we shuld rend as a sign of sorrow, as the Pharisees did, but rather our hearts, for it is not to men that we should appear to fast, but to our Father, who sees into the secret place of our souls, and who will repay us.]

In illo tempore: Dixit Iesus discipulis suis: Cum ieiunatis, nolite fieri sicut hypocritae, tristes. Exterminant enim facies suas, ut appareant hominibus ieiunantes. Amen dico vobis, quia receperunt mercedem suam. Tu autem, cum ieiunas, unge caput tuum, et faciem tuam lava, ne videaris hominibus ieiunans, sed Patri tuo, qui est in abscondito: et Pater tuus, qui videt in abscondito, reddet tibi. Nolite thesaurizare vobis thesauros in erra: ubi aerugo, et tinea demolitur: et ubi fures effodiunt, et furantur. Thesaurizate autem vobis thesauros in caelo: ubi neque aurugo, neque tinea demolitur; et ubi fures non effodiunt, nec furantur. Ubi enim est thesaurus tuus, ibi est et cor tuum. At that time Jesus said to His disciples: When you fast, be not as the hypocrites, sad. For they disfigure their face, that they may appear unto men to fast. Amen I say to you, they have received their reward. But thou, when thou fastest, anoint thy head and wash thy face, that thou appear not to men to fast, but to thy Father who is in secret: and thy Father who seeth in secret will repay Thee. Lay not up to yourselves treasures on earth: where the rust and moth consume, and where thieves break through and steal. But lay up to yourselves treasures in heaven: where neither the rust nor moth doth consume, and where thieves do not break through nor steal. For where thy treasure is, there is thy heart also.

OFFERTORY ¤ Ps. 29. 2, 3

Exaltabo te, Domine, quoniam suscepisti me, nec delectasti inimicos meos super me: Domine, clamavi ad te, et sanasti me. I will extol Thee, O Lord, for Thou hast upheld me, and hast not made my enemies to rejoice over me: O Lord, I have cried to Thee, and Thou hast healed me.

SECRET

Fac nos, quaesumus Domine, his muneribus offerendis convenienter aptari: quibus ipsius venerabilis sacramenti celebramus exordium. Per Dominum . . . Fit us, we beseech Thee, O Lord, to offer worthily these gifts, by which we celebrate the opening of this venerable Mystery. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost . . .

PREFACE

Preface for Lent

Vere dignum et iustum est, aequum et salutare, nos tibi semper, et ubique gratias agere: Domine sancte, Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus. Qui corporali ieiunio vitia comprimis, mentem elevas, virtutem largiris et praemia: per Christum Dominum nostrum. Per quem maiestatem tuam laudant Angeli, adorant Dominationes, tremunt Potestates. Coeli, coelorumque Virtutes, ac beata Seraphim, socia exsultatione concelebrant. Cum quibus et nostras voces, ut admitti iubeas deprecamur, supplici confessione dicentes: It it truly meet and just, right and for our salvation, that we should at all times, and in all places, give thanks unto Thee, O holy Lord, Father almighty, everlasting God; Who by this bodily fast, dost curb our vices, dost lift up our minds and bestow on us strength and rewards; through Christ our Lord. Through whom the Angels praise Thy Majesty, the Dominations worship it, the Powers stand in awe. The Heavens and the heavenly hosts together with the blessed Seraphim in triumphant chorus unite to celebrate it. Together with these we entreat Thee that Thou mayest bid our voices also to be admitted while we say with lowly praise:

COMMUNION ¤ Ps. 77. 29, 30

Qui meditabitur in lege Domini die ad nocte, davit fructum suum in tempore suo. He that shall meditate day and night on the law of the Lord, shall bring forth his fruit in due season.

POSTCOMMUNION

Percepta nobis, Domine, praebeant sacramenta subsidium: ut tibi grata sint nostra ieiunia, et nobis proficiant ad medelam. Per Dominum . . . May the Sacraments we have received afford us help, O Lord, that our fasts may be pleasing unto Thee, and profitable unto us for healing. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who liveth . . .

PRAYER OVER THE PEOPLE

Oremus. Humiliate capita vestra Deo. — Inclinantes se, Domine, maiestati tuae, propitiatus intende: ut qui divino munere sunt refecti, caelestibus semper nutriantur auxiliis. Per Dominum . . . Let us pray. Bow down your heads before God. — Look graciously, O Lord, upon us who bow down before Thy majesty: that we who have been refreshed by Thy divine Gift may ever be sustained by Thy heavenly aids. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son . . .

Indulgence of 500 days. — Plenary, under the usual conditions, if this invocation is daily recited during a month.


“The Mystery of Septuagesima” from Dom Gueranger’s “The Liturgical Year”

12 February 2017

Septuagesima

Overview

Theme:
Babylonian Captivity,

Man’s Fallen State

Color:
Purple

Mood:
Penance

Symbols:
chains, tears, Jeremias

Length:
Septuagesima Sunday to Shrove Tuesday

Septuagesima1 and Lent are both times of penance, Septuagesima being a time of voluntary fasting in preparation for the obligatory Great Fast of Lent. The theme is the Babylonian exile, the “mortal coil” we must endure as we await the Heavenly Jerusalem. Sobriety and somberness reign liturgically; the Alleluia and Gloria are banished

The Sundays of Septugesima are named for their distance away from Easter:

The first Sunday of Septuagesima gives its name to the entire season as it is known as “Septuagesima.” “Septuagesima” means “seventy,” and Septuagesima Sunday comes roughly seventy days before Easter. This seventy represents the seventy years of the Babylonian Captivity. It is on this Sunday that the alleluia is “put away,” not to be said again until the Vigil of Easter.

The second Sunday of Septuagesima is known as “Sexagesima, which means “sixty”. Sexagesima Sunday comes roughly sixty days before Easter.

The third Sunday of Septuagesima is known as “Quinquagesima,” which means “fifty” and which comes roughly fifty days before Easter.

Quadragesima means “forty,” and this is the name of the first Sunday of Lent and the Latin name for the entire season of Lent.

Throughout this short Season and that of Lent (next Season) you will notice a deepening sense of penance and somberness, culminating in Passiontide (the last two weeks of Lent), that will suddenly and joyously end at the Vigil of Easter on Holy Saturday when the alleluia returns and Christ’s Body is restored and glorified.

“The Mystery of Septuagesima”
from Dom Gueranger’s “The Liturgical Year”

The season upon which we are now entering is expressive of several profound mysteries. But these mysteries belong not only to the three weeks which are prearatory to Lent: they continue throughout the whole period of time which separates us from the great feast of Easter.

The number seven is the basis of all these mysteries. We have already seen how the holy Church came to introduce the season of Septuagesima into her calendar. Let us now meditate on the doctrine hidden under the symbols of her liturgy. And first, let us listen to St. Augustine, who thus gives is the clue to the whole of our season’s mysteries. ‘There are two times,’ says the holy Doctor: ‘one which is now, and is spent in the temptations and tribulations of this life; the other which shall by then, and shall be spent in eternal security and joy. In figure of these, we celebrate two periods: the time before Easter, and the time after Easter. That which is before Easter signifies the sorrow of this present life; that which is after Easter, the blessedness of our future state… Hence it is that we spend the first in fasting and prayer; and in the second we give up our fasting, and give ourselves to praise.’

 Jeremias lamenting the destruction of Ierusalem -Rembrandt


Jeremias lamenting the destruction of Ierusalem -Rembrandt

The Church, the interpreter of the sacred Scriptures, often speaks to us of two places, which correspond with these two times of St. Augustine. These two places are Babylon and Jerusalem. Babylon is the image of this world of sin, in the midst whereof the Christian has to spend his years of probation; Jerusalem is the heavenly country, where he is to repose after all his trials. The people of Israel, whose whole history is but one great type of the human race, was banished from Jerusalem and kept in bondage in Babylon.

Now, this captivity, which kept the Israelites exiles from Sion, lasted seventy years; and it is to express this mystery, as Alcuin, Amalarius, Ivo of Chartres, and all the great liturgists tell us, that the Church fixed the number of seventy for the days of expiation. It is true, there are but sixty-three days between Septuagesima and Easter; but the Church, according to the style so continually used in the sacred Scriptures, uses the round number instead of the literal and precise one.

The duration of the world itself, according to the ancient Christian tradition, is divided into seven ages. The human race must pass through the seven ages before the dawning of the day of eternal life. The first age included the time from the creation of Adam to Noah; the second begins with Noah and the renovation of the earth by the deluge, and ends with this the vocation of Abraham; the third opens with this first formation of God’s chosen people, and continues as far as Moses, through whom God gave the Law; the fourth consists of the period between Moses and David, in whom the house of Juda received the kingly power; the fifth is formed of the years which passed between David’s reign and the captivity of Babylon, inclusively; the sixth dates from the return of the Jews to Jerusalem, and takes us on as far as the birth of our Saviour. Then, finally, comes the seventh age; it starts with the rising of this merciful Redeemer, the Sun of justice, and is to continue till the dread coming of the Judge of the livng and the dead. These are the seven great divisions of time; after which, eternity.

In order to console us in the midst of the combats, which so thickly beset our path, the Church, like a beacon shining amidst the darkness of this our earthly abode, shows us another seven, which is to succeed the one we are now preparing to pass through. After the Septuagesima of mourning, we shall have the bright Easter with its seven weeks of gladness, foreshadowing the happiness and bliss of heaven. After having fasted with our Jesus, and suffered with Him, the day will come when we shall rise together with Him, and our hearts shall follow Him to the hightest heavesn; and then after a brief interval, we shall feel the Holy Ghost descending upon us, with His seven Gifts. The celebration of all these wondrous joys will take us seven weeks, as the great liturgists observe in their interpretation of the rites of the Church. The seven joyous weeks from Easter to Pentecost will not be too long for the future glad mysteries, which, after all, will be but figures of a still gladder future, the future of eternity.

Having heard these sweet whisperings of hope, let us now bravely face the realities brought before us by our dear mother the Church. We are sojourners upon this earth; we are exiles and captives in Babylon, that city which plots our ruin. If we love our country, if we long to return to it, we must be proof against the lying allurements of this strange land, and refuse the cup she proffers us, and with which she maddens so many of our fellow captives. She invites us to join in her feasts and her songs; but we must unstring our harps, and hang them on the willows that grow on her river’s bank, till the signal be given for our return to Jerusalem. She will ask us to sing to her the melodies of our dear Sion: but how shall we, who are so far from home, have heart to ‘sing the song of the Lord in a strange land’? No, there must be no sign that we are content to be in bondage, or we shall deserve to be slaves forever.

These are the sentiments wherewith the Church would inspire us during the penitential season which we are now beginning. She wishes us to reflect on the dangers that beset us; dangers which arise from ourselves and from creatures. During the rest of the year she loves to hear us chant the song of heavne, the sweet Alleluia; but now, she bids us close our lips to this word of joy, because we are in Babylon. We are pilgrims absent from our Lord, let us keep our glad hymn for the day of His return. We are sinners, and have but too often held fellowship with the world of God’s enemies; let us become purified by repentance, for it is written that ‘praise is unseemly in the mouth of a sinner.’

The leading feature, then, of Septuagesima, is the total suspension of the Alleluia, which is not to again be heard upon the earth until the arrival of that happy day, when having suffered death with our Jesus, and having been buried together with Him, we shall rise again with Him to a new life.

The sweet hymn of the angels, Gloria in excelsis Deo, which we have sung every Sunday since the birth of our Saviour in Bethlehem, is also taken from us; it is only on the feasts of the saints which may by kept during the week that we shall be allowed to repeat it. The night Office of the Sunday is to lose also, from now till Easter, its magnificent Ambrosian hymn, the Te Deum; and at the end of the holy Sacrifice, the deacon will no longer dismiss the faithful with his solemn Ite, Missa est, but will simply invite them to continue their prayers in silence, and bless the Lord, the God of mercy, who bears with us, notwithstanding all our sins.

After the Gradual of the Mass, instead of the thrice repeated Alleluia, which prepared our hearts to listen to the voice of God in the holy Gospel, we hsall hear but a mournful and protracted chant, called, on that account, the Tract.

That the eye, too, may teach us that the season we are entering on is one of mourning, the Church will vest her ministers (both on Sundays and on the days during the week which are not feasts of Saints) in the sombre purple. Until Ash Wednesday, however, she permits the deacon to wear his dalmatic, and the subdeacon his tunic; but from that day forward, they must lay aside these vestments of joy, for Lent will then have begun and our holy mother will inspire us with the deep spirit of penance, but suppressing everything of that glad pomp, which she loves at other seasons, to bring into the sanctuary of her God.

Footnotes:
1 Like Time after Epiphany and Time after Pentecost, this Season is known as “Ordinary Time” in the new calendar.

Thank you to Fisheaters a site where you can find All Things Catholic and traditional. Wonderful site.


Dom Guéranger, O.S.B. – The History of Septuagesima

11 February 2017

Posted by David Werling at the blog, “Ars Orandi”

 

From

The Liturgical Year

by Dom Guéranger, O.S.B.

THE HISTORY OF SEPTUAGESIMA

The season of Septuagesima comprises the three weeks immediately preceding Lent. It forms one of the principal divisions of the liturgical year, and is itself divided into three parts, each part corresponding to a week: the first is called Septuagesima; the second Sexagesima; the third, Quinquagesima.

All three are named from their numerical reference to Lent, which, in the language of the Church, is called Quadragesima, that is, Forty, because the great feast of Easter is prepared for by the holy exercises of forty days. The words Quinquagesima, Sexagesima, and Septuagesima, tell us of the same great solemnity as looming in the distance, and as being the great object towards which the Church would have us now begin to turn all our thoughts, and desires, and devotion.

Now, the feast of Easter must be prepared for by forty days of recollectedness and penance. Those forty days are one of the principal seasons of the liturgical year, and one of the most powerful means employed by the Church for exciting in the hearts of her children the spirit of their Christian vocation. It is of the utmost importance that such a season of grace should produce its work in our souls—the renovation of the whole spiritual life. The Church, therefore, has instituted a preparation for the holy time of Lent. She gives us the three weeks of Septuagesima, during which she withdraws us, as much as may be, from the noisy distractions of the world, in order that our hearts may be more readily impressed by the solemn warning she is to give us at the commencement of Lent by marking our foreheads with ashes.

This prelude to the holy season of Lent was not known in the early ages of Christianity: its institution would seem to have originated in the Greek Church. Besides the six Sundays of Lent, on which by universal custom the faithful never fasted, the practice of this Church prohibited fasting on the Saturdays likewise; consequently their Lent was short by twelve days of the forty spent by our Saviour doing penance in the desert. To make up the deficiency, they were obliged to begin their Lent so many days earlier, as we will show in our next volume.

The Church of Rome had no such motive for anticipating the season of those privations which belong to Lent; for, from the earliest antiquity, she kept the Saturdays in Lent (and as often during the rest of the year as circumstances might require) as fasting days. At the close of the sixth century, St. Gregory the Great alludes, in one of his homilies, to the fast of Lent being less than forty days, owing to the Sundays which come during that holy season. “There are,” he says, “from this day (the first Sunday of Lent) to the joyous feast of Easter, six weeks, that is forty-two days. As we do not fast on the six Sundays, there are but thirty-six fasting days… which we offer to God as the tithe of our year.”

It was, therefore, after the pontificate of St. Gregory, that the last four days of Quinquagesima week were added to Lent, in order that the number of fasting days might be exactly forty. As early, however, as the ninth century, the custom of beginning Lent on Ash Wednesday was of obligation in the whole Latin Church. All the manuscript copies of the Gregorian Sacramentary, which bear that date, entitle this Wednesday In capite jejunii, that is to say, the beginning of the fast; and Amalarius, who gives us every detail of the liturgy of the ninth century, tells us that it was, even then, the rule to begin the fast four days before the first Sunday of Lent. We find the practice confirmed by two Councils, held in that century. But, out of respect for the form of divine service drawn up by St. Gregory, the Church does not make any important change in the Office of these four days. Up to the Vespers of Saturday, when alone she begins the lenten rite, she observes the rubrics prescribed for Quinquagesima week.

Peter of Blois, who lived in the twelfth century, tells us what was the practice in his days. He says: “All religious begin the fast of Lent at Septuagesima; the Greeks, at Sexagesima; the clergy, at Quinquagesima; and the rest of Christians, who form the Church militant on earth, begin their Lent on the Wednesday following Quinquagesima.” The secular clergy, as we learn from these words, were bound to begin the lenten fast somewhat before the laity; though it was only by two days—that is, on Monday, as we gather from the Life of St. Ulric, bishop of Augsburg, written in the tenth century. The Council of Clermont, in 1095, at which Pope Urban II presided, has a decree sanctioning the obligation of the clergy to begin abstinence from flesh-meat at Quinquagesima. This Sunday was called, indeed, Dominica carnis privii, and carnis privium sacerdotum, that is, priests’ carnival Sunday; but the term is to be understood in the sense of the announcement being made, on that Sunday, of the abstinence having to begin on the following day. We shall find, further on, that a like usage was observed in the Greek Church on the three Sundays preceding Lent. This law, which obliged the clergy to these two additional days of abstinence, was in force in the thirteenth century, as we learn from the Council held at Angers, which threatens with suspension all priests who neglect to begin Lent on the Monday of Quinquagesima week.

This usage, however, soon became obsolete; and in the fifteenth century, the secular clergy, and even the monks themselves, began the lenten fast, like the rest of the faithful, on Ash Wednesday.

There can be no doubt that the original motive for the anticipation—which, after several modifications, was limited to the four days immediately preceding Lent—was to remove from the Greeks the pretext of taking scandal at the Latins, who did not fast fully forty days. Ratramnus, in is Controversy with the Greeks, clearly implies it. But the Latin Church did not think it necessary to carry her condescension farther, by imitating the Greek ante-lenten usages, which originated, as we have already said, in the eastern custom of not fasting on Saturdays.*

Thus it was that the Roman Church, by this anticipation of Lent by four days, gave the exact number of forty days to the holy season, which she had instituted in imitation of the forty days spent by our Saviour in the desert. Whilst faithful to her ancient practice of looking on the Saturday as a day appropriate for penitential exercises, she gladly borrowed from the Greek Church the custom of preparing for Lent, by giving the liturgy of the three preceding weeks a tone of holy mournfulness. Even as early as the beginning of the ninth century, as we learn from Amalarius, the Alleluia and Gloria in excelsis were suspended in the Septuagesima Offices. The monks conformed to the custom, although the Rule of St. Benedict prescribed otherwise. Finally, in the second half of the eleventh century, Pope Alexander II enacted that the total suspension of the Alleluia should be everywhere observed, beginning with the Vespers of the Saturday preceding Septuagesima Sunday. This Pope was but renewing a rule already sanctioned, in that same century, by Pope Leo IX, and inserted in the body of Canon Law.

Thus was the present important period of the liturgical year, after various changes, established in the cycle of the Church. It has been there upwards of a thousand years. Its name, Septuagesima (seventy), expresses, as we have already remarked, a numerical relation to Quadragesima (the forty days); although, in reality, there are not seventy but only sixty-three days from Septuagesima Sunday to Easter. We will speak of the mystery of the name in the following chapter. The first Sunday of Lent being called Quadragesima (forty), each of the three previous Sundays has a name expressive of an additional ten; the nearest to Lent, Quinquagesima (fifty); the middle one, Sexagesima (sixty); the third, Septuagesima (seventy).

As the season of Septuagesima depends upon the time of the Easter celebration, it comes sooner or later according to the changes of that great feast. January 18 and February 22 are called the “Septuagesima keys,” because the Sunday, which is called Septuagesima, cannot be earlier in the year than the first, nor later than the second, of these two days.

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*The Gallican liturgy had retained several usages of the oriental Churches, to which it owed, in part, its origin; hence, it was not without some difficulty that the custom of fasting and abstaining on Saturdays was introduced into Gaul. Until such time as the Churches of that country had adopted the Roman custom, in that point of discipline, they were necessitated to anticipate the fast of Lent. The first Council of Orleans, held in the early part of the sixth century, enjoins the faithful to observe, before Easter, Quadragesima (as the Latins call Lent), and not Quinquagesima, “in order,” says the Council, “That unity of custom may be maintained.” Towards the close of the same century, the fourth Council held in the same city, repeats the same prohibition, and explains the intentions of making such an enactment, by ordering that the Saturdays during Lent should be observed as days of fasting. Previously to this, that is, in the years 511 and 541, the first and second Councils of Orange had combated the same abuse, by also withdrawing from the faithful the obligation of commencing the fast at Quinquagesima. The introduction of the Roman liturgy into France, which was brought about the by the zeal of Pepin and Charlemagne, finally established in that country the custom of keeping the Saturday as a day of penance; and as we have just seen, the beginning Lent on Quinquagesima was not observed excepting by the clergy. In the thirteenth century, the only Church in the patriarchate of the west, which began Lent earlier than the Church of Rome, was that of Poland: its Lent opened on the Monday of Septuagesima, which was owing to the rite of the Greek Church being so much used in Poland. The custom was abolished, even for that country, by Pope Innocent IV in the year 1248.

(Images of the beautiful vestments in this post, courtesy Michele Quigley, who restored them.)

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Thank you to our good friend, Deo Volente at his blog, Traditional Latin Mass in Md for this post.


Fourth Sunday of Advent Latin Mass Propers and Music Link for Mass

18 December 2016

The Season of Advent

(To follow the Mass in the Extraordinary Form, please click HERE
Livestreamed from Christ the King Roman Catholic Church in Florida, an FSSP parish at 10:30 AM EST – Mass goes live ten mins before Mass) replay available…

Fourth Sunday of Advent
Dominica IV Adventus
Missa ‘Rorate Coeli’
Purple

1st Class

[STATION AT THE TWELVE APOSTLES]

The Catholic liturgy reminds us, during these four weeks, of the time during which the world was without Jesus. This Mediator we now await, and since we can go to God only through Him, we implore Him to hasten His coming.

INTROIT ¤ Isaias 45. 8

Rorate, coeli, desuper, et nubes pluant iustum: aperiatur terra, et germinet Salvatorem. — Coeli enarrant gloriam Dei: et opera manuum eius annuntiat fimamentum. V.: Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen. Rorate, coeli, desuper, et nubes pluant iustum: aperiatur terra, et germinet Salvatorem. Drop down dew, ye heavens, from above, and let the clouds rain the Just: let the earth be opened and bud forth a Savior. — (Ps. 18. 2). The heavens show forth the glory of God: and the firmament declareth the work of His hands. V.: Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen. Drop down dew, ye heavens, from above, and let the clouds rain the Just: let the earth be opened and bud forth a Savior.
The Gloria in Excelsis is omitted.

COLLECT

Excita, quaesumus Domine, potentiam tuam, et veni, et magna nobis virtute succurre; ut per auxilium gratiae tuae, quod nostra peccata praepediunt, indulgentia tuae propitiationibus acceleret: qui vivis et regnas cum Deo Patre in unitate Spiritus Sancti Deus, per omnia saecula saeculorum. O Lord, we beseech Thee, stir up Thy power, and come, and with great might succor us: that by the help of Thy grace that which is hindered by our sins may be hastened by Thy merciful forgiveness. Who livest and reignest, with God the Father, in the unity of the Holy Ghost God, world without end.

EPISTLE ¤ I Cor. 4. 1-5

Lesson from the first Epistle of Blessed Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians.
Lectio Epistolae beati Pauli Apostoli ad Corinthios.
[St. Paul speaks of the ministers of Christ, and addressing those who judge their pastors he reminds them that He alone who shall come one day as Judge has the right to do this.]
Fratres: Sic nos existimet homo ut ministros Christi, et dispensatores mysteriorum Dei. Hic iam quaeritur inter dispensatores, ut fidelis quis inveniatur. Mihi autem pro minimo est, ut a vobis iudicer, aut ab humano die: sed neque meipsum iudico. Nihil enim mihi conscius sum: sed non in hoc iustificatus sum: qui autem iudicat me, Dominus est. Itaque nolite ante tempus iudicare, quoadusque veniat Dominus: qui et illuminabit abscondita tenebrarum, et manifestabit consilia cordium: et tunc laus erit unicuique a Deo. Brethren, Let a man so account of us as of the ministers of Christ and the dispensers of the mysteries of God. Here now it is required among the dispensers that a man be found faithful. But to me it is a very small thing to be judged by you or by man’s day: but neither do I judge my own self. For I am not conscious to myself of anything: yet am I not hereby justified, by He that judges me is the Lord. Therefore judge not before the time, until the Lord come: Who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels fo the hearts: and then shall every man have praise from God.

GRADUAL ¤ Ps. 144. 18, 21

Prope est Dominus omnibus invocantibus eum: omnibus qui invocant eum in veritate. V.: Laudem Domini loquetur os meum et benedicat omnis caro nomen sanctum eius.
Alleluia, alleluia. V.: Veni, Domine, et noli tardare: relaza facinora plebis tuae Israel. Alleluia. The Lord is nigh unto all them that call upon Him: to all that call upon Him in truth. V.: My mouth shall speak the praise of the Lord: and let all flesh bless His Holy Name.
Alleluia, alleluia. V.: Come, O Lord, and tarry not: forgive the sins of Thy people Israel. Alleluia.
When on the Ferias of Advent the Mass of the Sunday is used, the Alleluia and its verses are not said, but only the Gradual.


GOSPEL ¤ Luke 3. 1-6

† Continuation of the holy Gospel according to St. Luke.
†Sequentia sancti Evangelii secundum Lucam.
[The day of mercy is coming proclaimed by John the Baptist.]
Anno quintodecimo imperii Tiberii Caesaris, procurante Pontio Pilato Iudaeam, tetrarcha autem Galilaeae Herode, Philippo autem fratre eius tetrarcha Ituraeae, et Trachonitidis regionis, et Lysania Abilinae tetrarcha, sub principibus sacerdotum Anna et Caipha: factum est verbum Domini super Ioannem, Zachariae filium, in deserto. Et venit in omnem regionem Iordanis, praedicans baptismum paenitentiae in remissionem peccatorum, sicut scriptum est in libro sermonum Isaiae Prophetae: Vox clamantis in deserto: Parate viam Domini: rectas facite semitas eius: omnis vallis implebitur: et omnis mons et collis humiliabitur: et erunt prava in directa, et aspera in vias planas: et videbit omnis caro salutare Dei. Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and Philip his brother tetrarch of Iturea and the country of Trachonitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilina, under the high priests Annas and Caiphas: the word of the Lord was made unto John, the son of Zachary, in the desert. And he came into all the country about the Jordan, preaching the baptism of penance for the remission of sins, as it was written in the book of the sayings of the Isaias the prophet: A voice of one crying out in the wilderness: Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make straight His paths: every valley shall be filled: and every mountain shall be made straight, and the rough ways plain: and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.

OFFERTORY ¤ Luke 1. 28, 42

Ave Maria, gratia plena: Dominus tecum: benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui. Hail Mary, full of grace: the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb.

SECRET

Sacrificiis praesentibus, quaesumus Domine, placatus intende; ut et devotioni nostrae proficiant, et saluti. Per Dominum nostrum, Iesum Christum, Filium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti Deus, per omnia saecula saeculorum. O Lord, we beseech Thee, look down favorably upon these present Sacrifices: that they may profit us both unto devotion and salvation. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who liveth and reigneth in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, world without end.

PREFACE

Preface of Advent
Vere dignum et iustum est, aequum et salutare, nos tibi semper, et ubique gratias agere: Domine sancte, Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus, per Christum Dominum nostrum; quem, perdito humanum generi, Salvatorem misericors et fidelis promisisti, cuius veritas instrueret inscios, sanctitas iustificaret impios, virtus adiuvaret infirmos. Dum ergo prope est ut veniat quem missurus es, et dies affulget liberationis nostrae, in hac promissionum tuarum fide piis gaudiis exsultamus. Et ideo cum Angelis et Archangelis, cum Thronis et Dominationibus, cumque omni militiae caelestis exercitus, hymnum gloriae tuae canimus, sine fine dicentes: It is truly meet and just, right and for our salvation, that we should in all times, and in all places, give thanks to Thee, holy Lord, Father almighty, eternal God, through Christ our Lord. Whom Thou, clement and faithful, promised as a Savior to the lost race of men; Whose truth instructed the ignorant, Whose sanctity justified the impious, Whose virtues strengthened the weak. Therefore while the advent approaches of Him Who was sent, and the day of our liberation draws ever nearer, we exalt with pious joys in the confidence of Thy promises. And therefore, with angels and archangels, with Thrones and Dominations, and with all the host of the heavenly army, we sing a hymn to Thy glory, ever saying:
Or the celebrant may say:
Preface of the Most Holy Trinity
Vere dignum et iustum est, aequum et salutare, nos tibi semper, et ubique gratias agere: Domine sancte, Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus. Qui cum unigenito Filio tuo, et Spiritu Sancto, unus es Deus, unus es Dominus: non in unius singularitate personae, sed in unius Trinitate substantiae. Quod enim de tua gloria, revelante te, credimus, hoc de Filio tuo, hoc de Spiritu Sancto, sine differentia discretionis sentimus. Ut in confessione verae, sempiternaeque Deitatis, et in personis proprietas, et in essentia unitas, et in maiestate adoretur aequalitas. Quam laudant Angeli atque Archangeli, Cherubim quoque ac Seraphim: qui non cessant clamare quotidie, una voce dicentes: It it truly meet and just, right and for our salvation, that we should at all times, and in all places, give thanks unto Thee, O holy Lord, Father almighty, everlasting God; Who, together with Thine only-begotten Son, and the Holy Ghost, art one God, one Lord: not in the oneness of a single Person, but in the Trinity of one substance. For what we believe by Thy revelation of Thy glory, the same do we believe of Thy Son, the same of the Holy Ghost, without difference or separation. So that in confessing the true and everlasting Godhead, distinction in persons, unity in essence, and equality in majesty may be adored. Which the Angels and Archangels, the Cherubim also and Seraphim do praise: who cease not daily to cry out, with one voice saying:


COMMUNION ¤ Isaias 7. 4

Ecce Virgo concipiet et pariet filium: et vocabitur nomen eius Emmanuel. Behold a Virgin shall conceive and bear a Son: and His name shall be called Emmanuel.

POSTCOMMUNION

Sumptis muneribus, quaesumus Domine, ut cum frequentatione mysterii, crescat nostrae salutis effectus. Per Dominum nostrum, Iesum Christum, Filium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti Deus, per omnia saecula saeculorum. Having received Thy gifts, we beseech Thee, O Lord: that as we frequent this Mystery, so the world of our salvation may advance. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, world without end.



The Feast of All Saints-Omnium Sanctorum-Missa ‘Gaudeamus’

1 November 2016

all-saints-day-390x220

Die 1 novembris

Omnium Sanctorum

Introitus: Ps. 32Gaudeamus… Sanctorum omnium (3m09.8s – 2969 kb) 

Graduale: Ps. 33, 10. V. 11b Timete Dominum (2m33.1s – 2395 kb) 

Alleluia: Mt. 11, 28Venite ad me (3m34.5s – 3355 kb) 

Offertorium: Sap. 3, 1.2.3 Iustorum animæ (2m25.8s – 2281 kb) 

Communio: Mt. 5, 8.9.10 Beati mundo corde (1m29.8s – 1408 kb) 

Litaniae Sanctorum + Litany of the Saints / Litanie dei Santi

H/T Traditional Latin Mass in Maryland for sources, ChristusRex (for Mp3’s) FSH122333’s and danthonycal’s Channel on You Tube for videos.


Septuagesima Sunday – Missa ‘Circumdederunt Me’ – Live Stream EF Mass with Propers 10:30 am EST

1 February 2015

Please click here for link

All times are Eastern Standard Time

Septuagesima_Sun_Pic

Septuagesima Sunday – Matt 20:1-16

Septuagesima Sunday

Purple

2nd Class

[STATION AT ST. LAWRENCE OUTSIDE THE WALLS]

INTROIT ¤ Ps. 17. 5-7
Circumdederunt me gemitus mortus, dolores inferni circumdederunt me: et in tribulatione mea invocavi Dominum, et exaudivit de templo sancto suo vocem meam. — Diligam te, Domine, fortitudo mea: Dominus firmamentum meum, et refugium meum, et liberator meus. V.: Gloria Patri . . . — Circumdederunt me gemitus . . . The sorrows of death surrounded me, the sorrows of hell encompassed me; and in my affliction I called upon the Lord, and He heard my voice from His holy temple. — (Ps.17. 2, 3). I will love Thee, O Lord, my strength: the Lord is my firmament, my refuge, and my deliverer. V.: Glory be to the Father . . . — The sorrows of death surrounded me . . .

The Gloria in Excelsis is not said.

COLLECT.–Graciously hear, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the prayers of Thy people, that we, who are justly afflicted for our sins, may for the glory of Thy Name, be mercifully delivered. Through our Lord . . .

EPISTLE ¤ 1 Cor. 9. 24-27; 10. 1-5
Lesson from the Epistle of blessed Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians.

[The Apostle St. Paul compares our life to an arena where we must fight and mortify ourselves, if we wish to obtain the victory.]
Brethren, Know you not that they that run in the race, all run indeed, but one receiveth the prize? So run that you may obtain. And every one that striveth for the mastery refraineth himself from all things; and they indeed that they may receive a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible one. I therefore so run, not as at an uncertainty; I so fight, not as one beating the air: but I chastise my body, and bring it into subjection: lest perhaps when I have preached to others, I myself should become a castaway. For I would not have you ignorant, brethren, that our fathers were all under the cloud, and all passed through the sea, and all in Moses were baptized, in the cloud and in the sea: and did all eat the same spiritual food, and drank the same spiritual drink: (that they drank of the spiritual rock that followed them: and the rock was Christ.) But with most of them God was not well pleased.

GRADUAL ¤ Ps. 101. 16-17
Adjutor in opportunitatibus, in tribulatione: sperent in te, quo noverunt te: quoniam non derelinquis quaerentes te, Domine. V.: Quoniam non in finem oblivio erit pauperis: patientia pauperum non peribit in aeternum: exsurge, Domine, non praevaleat homo. A Helper in due time in tribulation: let them trust in Thee who know Thee: for Thou hast not forsaken them that seek Thee, O Lord. V.: For the poor man shall not be forgotten to the end: the patience of the poor shall not perish for ever: arise, O Lord, let not man prevail.

TRACT ¤ Ps. 129. 1-4
De profundis clamavi ad te, Domine: Domine, exaudi vocem meam. V.: Fiant aures tuae intendentes in orationem servi tui. V.: Si iniquitates observaveris, Domine: Domine, quis sustinebit? V.: Quia apud te propitiatio est, et propter legem uam sustinui te, Domine. Out of the depths I have cried to Thee, O Lord: Let Thine ears be attentive to the prayer of Thy servant. V.: If Thou, O Lord, wilt mark iniquities: Lord, who shall stand it? V.: For with Thee there is merciful forgiveness, and by reason of Thy law I have waited for Thee, O Lord.

GOSPEL ¤ Matth. 20. 1-16
† Continuation of the holy Gospel according to St. Matthew.

[The parable of the vineyard shows us that we must all work to obtain the reward of eternal life.]
At that time Jesus spoke to His disciples this parable: The kingdom of God is like to a householder who went out early in the morning to hire laborers in his vineyard. And having agreed with the laborers for a penny a day, he sent them into his vineyard. And going out about the third hour, he saw others standing in the market place idle, and he said to them: Go you also into my vineyard, and I will give you what shall be just. And they went their way. And again he went out about the sixth and ninth hour: and did in like manner. But about the eleventh hour he went out and found others standing, and he saith to them: Why stand you here all the day idle? The say to him: Becase no man hath hired us. He saith to them: Go you also into my vineyard. And when evening was come, the lord of the vineyard saith to his steward: Call the laborers and pay them their hire, beginning from the last even to the first. When therefore they were come that came about the eleventh hour, they received every man a penny. But when the first also came, they thought that they should receive more: and they also received every man a penny. And receiving it they murmured against the master of the house, saying: These last have worked but one hour, and thou hast made them equal to us that have borne the burden of the day and the heats. But he answering said to one of them: Friend, I do thee no wrong; didst thou not agree with me for a penny? Take what is thine and go thy way: I will also give to this last even as to thee. Or, is it not lawful for me to do what I will? Is thine eye evil, because I am good? So shall the last be first, and the first last. For many are called, but few chosen.

OFFERTORY ¤ Ps. 91. 2
Bonum est confiteri Domino, et psallere nomini tuo, Altissime. It is good to give praise to the Lord, and to sing to Thy Name, O Most High.

SECRET.–Receive our offerings and prayers, we beseech Thee, O Lord, and both cleanse us by these heavenly mysteries, and graviously hear us. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who liveth and reigneth . . .

PREFACE
Preface of the Most Holy Trinity
Vere dignum et justum est, aequum et salutare, nos tibi semper, et ubique gratias agere: Domine sancte, Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus. Qui cum unigenito Filio tuo, et Spiritu Sancto, unus es Deus, unus es Dominus: non in unius singularitate personae, sed in unius Trinitate substantiae. Quod enim de tua gloria, revelante te, credimus, hoc de Filio tuo, hoc de Spiritu Sancto, sine differentia discretionis sentimus. Ut in confessione verae, sempiternaeque Deitatis, et in personis proprietas, et in essentia unitas, et in majestate adoretur aequalitas. Quam laudant Angeli atque Archangeli, Cherubim quoque ac Seraphim: qui non cessant clamare quotidie, una voce dicentes: It it truly meet and just, right and for our salvation, that we should at all times, and in all places, give thanks unto Thee, O holy Lord, Father almighty, everlasting God; Who, together with Thine only-begotten Son, and the Holy Ghost, art one God, one Lord: not in the oneness of a single Person, but in the Trinity of one substance. For what we believe by Thy revelation of Thy glory, the same do we believe of Thy Son, the same of the Holy Ghost, without difference or separation. So that in confessing the true and everlasting Godhead, distinction in persons, unity in essence, and equality in majesty may be adored. Which the Angels and Archangels, the Cherubim also and Seraphim do praise: who cease not daily to cry out, with one voice saying:

COMMUNION ¤ Ps. 30. 17-18
Illumina faciem tuam super servum tuum, et salvum me fac in tua misericordia: Domine, non confundar, quoniam invocavi te. Make Thy face to shine upon Thy servant, and save me in Thy mercy: let me not be confounded, O Lord, for I have called upon Thee.

POSTCOMMUNION.–May Thy faithful people, O God, be strengthened by Thy gifts; that in receiving them, they may seek after them the more, and in seeking them, may receive them for ever. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with Thee. ..

Thank you to Traditional Latin Mass in Maryland for their continuing superb work providing us with all we need for the Traditional Latin Mass.

“Amazing Things Happening in Madison, Wisconsin”

22 August 2014

posted by Ben Yanke at the blog,
New Liturgical Movement

I try not to be focused too much on my own diocese and parish when I post on NLM, but this post, I’m going to depart from that. I firmly believe that my bishop, Bishop Robert Morlino, is one of the best in the country. As “exhibit A” of this statement, I want to tell you about the recent seminarian gathering that took place.

seminarians madisonOnce a year, the 35 or so seminarians of the diocese gather for over a week to spend time together socializing with each other and with the bishop, learning, and praying together, before heading their separate ways for school. One of the things that is always included is a celebration (or more) in the Extraordinary Form (EF), thanks to Bishop Morlino’s love of the old form, and desire to see it spread. Last year, the low Mass was followed by a talk by our Bishop to the seminarians, where he told them they would all learn the EF before being ordained,which is absolutely fantastic.

While I am not a seminarian myself, I am often around assisting in various capacities (last year, I was MC for this Mass, this year, I sang for the Mass). Yesterday, there was a Solemn Mass celebrated for them, and all the seminarians either served or sat in choir, which allowed them to experience this different, less common form of celebration. It was an absolutely beautiful experience seeing all of them worshiping God, and also being exposed to some of the rich liturgical traditions of our Catholic faith.

lowmassThe liturgical (and I dare say, pastoral) outlook of these wonderful men makes me thrilled for the future of the church and particularly the Diocese of Madison. I think I can safely say they are receiving some of the best formation in the country. I know in my diocese, knowing most of these awesome men personally, the Diocese of Madison will be a truly amazing place in 20 years when the are pastors, working for the salvation of souls and restoration of sanity and beauty in the liturgy. I hope and pray that more dioceses follow in our footsteps and help future priests learn an appreciation for both forms of the Roman Rite. In addition to that, he has frequently celebrated his public feast day Masses in the EF (for example, and another one), in an effort to expose more people to it as well. And currently, he has been celebrating a pontifical Mass at the throne multiple times a year, with hopes to continue the pattern.

And while I’m sure many of you who read NLM are people who love the EF, he has not neglected to being sanity and beauty to the ordinary form as well. The diocese has sponsored workshops on gregorian chant for musicians, strong homilies on the truths of the faith, beautiful examples of vestments even in the ordinary form both on special occasions and typical Sundays, and as someone who sees musicam saram as important, he very frequently chants his prayers and dialogs.


For the rest of the post please click HERE

………………………………………………………………………
benyanke-com-website-sidebarBen Yanke is a catholic college freshman who was homeschooled K-12, loves his big family, but most of all, HE’S CATHOLIC!

From the Ordinary to the Extraordinary was started as a place to post my thoughts on things I enjoy and care about, anything from the ordinary and mundane things of everyday life to the extraordinary exciting things. Some of my passions include cross country running, sacred music, the liturgy, web design, media production.

I am in residence in the Diocese of Madison, WI, under the care of the Extraordinary Ordinary™, Bishop Robert Morlino.

I am a board member for the Tridentine Mass Society of the Madison, and is also the director for their Schola Cantorum. If you are in the Madison area and interested in joining us or learning Gregorian chant, please contact me!

Please visit Ben’s Blog “From the Ordinary to the Extraordinary”


@ManwithBlackHat: “The Latin Mass: Why You (Still) Can’t Have It ” Say it ain’t so Dave…

9 July 2014

by David Alexander
at his blog,ManwithBlackHat

……………………………………….

nolite-tengere

It was seven years ago  — the date was 07/07/07, by the way — that His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI announced the removal of all restrictions to the celebration of the Traditional form of the Roman Mass, in his motu proprio (that is, on his own initiative) decree Summorum Pontificum.

The rest of this very thought-provoking piece can be read HERE


Meet Ben Yanke: An Extraordinary Young Man with a Truly Catholic Blog

20 February 2014

Posted by Ben Yanke at his blog,
From the Ordinary to the Extraordinary

Free EXORCISED Holy Water and Blessed Salt!

14_01_06_epiphany-1-300x225A few months ago, Fr Zuhlsdorf blessed and exorcised a whole load of holy water and blessed salt (about 30 gallons of holy water, 20-30 containers of kitchen salt), as he posted about here. Best of all, he used the special blessing and exorcism formula that is only used on epiphany. Yes, holy water is holy water, but these prayers have power. Exorcisms especially, have a great spiritual power, and I would really encourage you to read more at WDTPRS above about these exorcisms.

CLICK HERE for your free holy water and blessed salt

These things have POWER. Take advantage of them.

Ben YankeNow we have given you just a taste of Ben’s blog. It’s full of unique posts about things Catholic (Traditional and orthodox) and other interests of Ben, a very interesting young man who blogs from the great state of Wisconsin.

Now CLICK HERE for another of Ben’s very interesting and unique posts. Enjoy, we do! Hint: What do My Little Pony and the Mass have in common? Go there to read the answer!


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